Climate Change


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2021 Shifting Seasons Summit

The 3rd Shifting Seasons Summit (April 19-21) will include climate adaptation training sessions tailored to the needs and capabilities of Tribal Nations, but will focus on the development of in-depth case studies based on existing Tribal adaptation work in the Northeast region. This summit would also include relevant Tribal climate change initiatives developed outside of the northeast by capacity-building organizations, academic institutions and tribes who have approved climate adaptation plans, thus creating continued network building opportunities. Learn more and register.


Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Resilience Program Releases 2021 RFP Opportunity

The Bureau of Indian Affairs is pleased to announce the availability of funding through the Tribal Climate Resilience Program (BIA-TRP). The BIA-TRP will provide funding for activities that support Tribal adaptation and resilience planning, ocean and coastal management planning, and relocation, managed retreat, or protect-in-place planning and design activities for coastal and riverine communities. The Program aims to support Tribal Nations that are working toward climate adaptation planning and need information for management decisions that affect tribal trust and treaty resources, economies, infrastructure, and human health and welfare. The solicitation is for federally-recognized Tribal Nations and Tribal organizations (as defined by 25 U.S.C. Section 5304(1)). Other entities may participate as sub-grantees.   While both Federally-recognized Tribal Nations and Tribal organizations are eligible for funding through this solicitation, Tribal organization proposals will be reviewed and ranked separately from Tribal Nation proposals. 

The solicitation is available here.  Please also see the BIA Tribal Resilience Program site for more information (fillable cover pages, fillable application forms for Categories 3, 5, 6, 8, and 9, FAQs, helpful regional contacts, summaries of previous awards, etc.). An information webinar will be held on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 from 3:00-4:30pm Eastern Standard Time (2 PM Central Time). It will be hosted by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals. Please register here. ITEP will provide a link to the recorded webinar within a few days of the webinar for those unable to attend.


Maine’s Proposed Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine Updates Implicate a Cultural Resource of The Wabanaki People

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry’s Plant Health Program and the Maine Forest Service have announced a proposed update to the current state administered quarantine for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). EAB is an invasive forest pest with a heightened preference for the culturally significant black or brown ash trees, the principal building material for baskets produced by Wabanaki Tribal Artisans. On March 15th, a Public hearing was held by the Maine Forest Service to hear public comment and testimony about the proposed changes. A number of concerned Tribal Citizens and natural resource staff were present for the meeting and shared concerns about how relaxing the quarantine parameters and boundaries, as proposed in two of the updated quarantine options, would be problematic to the ongoing efforts of Wabanaki Tribal Nations in sustaining brown ash trees on the landscape. The viewpoints shared, pointed to the use of brown ash trees by Tribal basket makers and its connection to the cultural identity of the Wabanaki people. The proposed changes are anticipated to enable the movement of fuel wood to state residence in parts of the state that are currently restricted under the state’s active quarantine. USET’s Forest Adaptation Technical Assistant provided testimony during the public hearing and was quoted by the local news source, WABI-TV, Bangor. Access the news article and segment and view the proposed quarantine changes. The proposed changes are still open for public comment. Written comments may be submitted until 5 PM on April 2 to gary.fish@maine.gov or Gary Fish, Maine DACF – Horticulture, 28 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333-0028.


Hot off the press!
Article of culturally based Adaptation framework: Tribal Nations in USET region, Sea Level Rise, and Water Security

Sea level rise (SLR) poses significant threats to northeast and mid-Atlantic Tribal Nations’ climate and water justice. Existing SLR adaptation frameworks do not include Indigenous knowledge. Furthermore, SLR adaptation policy prioritizes economic and property rights and is misaligned with Indigenous coastal protection priorities. If Tribal Nations are to respond effectively to SLR then adaptation frameworks must be designed and developed by Indigenous Peoples for Indigenous Peoples. Eastern coastal Tribal Nations have a unique history of survival and resilience despite settler-colonial expansion in the northeast and mid-Atlantic regions of what is currently referred to as the United States. Experiences of eastern Atlantic coastal Tribal Nations highlight innovative response strategies for SLR adaptation and coastal stewardship practices not reflected in existing adaptation frameworks for the region. Indigenist SLR adaptation frameworks that utilize Indigenous knowledge are needed to combat water security issues resulting from SLR risks such as flooding, saltwater intrusion, storm surge, and erosion. This article proposes the WAMPUM adaptation framework informed by northeastern and mid-Atlantic coastal Tribal Nation science and knowledge systems for climate change adaptation to SLR.
To read the entire publication click here.


NCAI Commendation of President Biden’s Day One Executive Actions Addressing Climate Change

On January 21, 2021, President Biden revoked the Presidential permit granted to the Keystone XL pipeline by executive order and signed an instrument to rejoin the Paris Agreement. NCAI applauds the Administration’s decision to prioritize climate change and the sovereignty of Tribal Nation on day one. 
View the executive order.
View the Paris Climate Agreement.
View NCAI’s resolution opposing the Keystone XL Pipeline.
View NCAI’s resolution to support the Paris Climate Agreement.

On January 27, President Biden released a fact sheet providing an overview of his Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad executive order. View the fact sheet.


Tribal Review of the Congressional Climate Action Plan

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) in partnership with Tribal Nations and Tribal organizations across the country led an effort to perform a Tribal Review of the 2020 Congressional document titled: Solving the Climate Crisis: The Congressional Action Plan for a Clean Energy Economy and a Healthy, Resilient, and Just America. The Congressional Action Plan (CAP) was developed by the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. The CAP aims to fulfill a set of integrated goals to reach net-zero emissions by 2050; reduce pollution in environmental justice communities; and reach net-negative emissions in the second half of the 21st century. Both the CAP and the Tribal Review can be found on ATNI’s Climate Change page.

The purpose of the Tribal Review is to provide Tribal Nations, inter-tribal organizations, and other interested parties with a framework of the CAP that will:

  1. Provide information to Tribal leaders regarding impacts and opportunities, gaps, concerns, and Tribal priorities identified in a critical review of the CAP;
  2. Assist Tribal leaders in strategizing to address the priorities and gaps of the CAP;
  3. Provide draft language that Tribal leaders may deploy in communications with policymakers to advance fulfillment of objectives, including Tribal resolutions.

Funding Opportunities
and Resources

FY21 Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Feedstock Technologies and Algae FOA
Applications due April 5, 2021. The purpose of this modification is to update the EPIC system to provide a field to upload the Technical Datasheet that is required for the Full Application under Topic Area 2, and to provide the associated Technical Datasheet template. No changes to the FOA document are made as part of this modification. DOE’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) develops technologies that convert domestic biomass and waste resources into fuels, products, and power to enable affordable energy, economic growth, and innovation in renewable energy and chemicals production. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0002423 will support BETO’s highest priority research and development (R&D) areas in two BETO programs: Feedstock Technologies and Advanced Algal Systems. Both Topic Areas support BETO’s objectives to reduce the minimum selling price of drop-in biofuels, lower the cost of biopower, and enable high-value products from biomass or waste resources. For more information and to apply, click here.

 

Bureau of Indian Affairs – Tribal Resilience Program
Applications are due April 23, 2021. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is pleased to announce the availability of funding through the Tribal Climate Resilience Program (Program). The Program will provide funding for activities that support Tribal adaptation and resilience planning, ocean and coastal management planning, and relocation, managed retreat, or protect-in-place planning and design activities for coastal and riverine communities. The Program aims to support Tribal Nations that are working toward climate adaptation planning and need information for management decisions that affect tribal trust and treaty resources, economies, infrastructure, and human health and welfare. The solicitation is for federally-recognized Tribal Nations and Tribal organizations* (as defined by 25 U.S.C. Section 5304(1)). Other entities may participate as sub-grantees. 

While both Federally-recognized Tribal Nations and Tribal organizations are eligible for funding through this solicitation, Tribal organization proposals will be reviewed and ranked separately from Tribal Nation proposals. 

The solicitation is available here.  Please also see the BIA Tribal Resilience Program site for more information (fillable cover pages, fillable application forms for Categories 3, 5, 6, 8, and 9, FAQs, helpful regional contacts, summaries of previous awards, etc.).

An information webinar will be held on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 from 3:00-4:30pm Eastern Standard Time (2 PM Central Time). It will be hosted by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals. Please register here. ITEP will provide a link to the recorded webinar within a few days of the webinar for those unable to attend.

 

Coastal Program Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service
Applications due September 30, 2021. The Coastal Program is a voluntary, community-based program that provides technical and financial assistance through cooperative agreements to coastal communities, conservation partners, and landowners to restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat on public and private lands. The Coastal Program staff coordinates with partners, stakeholders, and other Service programs to identify geographic focus areas and develop habitat conservation goals and priorities within these focus areas. Geographic focus areas are where the Coastal Program directs resources to conserve habitat for Federal trust species. Projects are developed in collaboration with partners, and with substantial involvement from Service field staff. Coastal Program projects must support the missions of the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), and the Coastal Program, and be based on sound scientific biological principles. For more information and to apply, click here.

 

Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI)
Fact Sheet:
Federal Resources for Nature-Based Solutions to Climate Change has provided this fact sheet as a survey of federal funding and technical assistance available to help state and local governments and agencies, Tribal Nations, non-governmental organizations, universities, and individuals implement nature-based solutions for climate resilience. Many of these sources of federal support allow communities to develop projects which draw on the multiple, interrelated benefits of nature-based solutions.  To access the fact sheet, click here.

 

DOC EDA FY2019 EDA Disaster Supplementals
Applications are accepted on a continuing basis and processed as received. This investment assistance will help communities and regions devise and implement long-term economic recovery strategies through a variety of non-construction and construction projects, as appropriate, to address economic challenges in areas where a Presidential declaration of a major disaster was issued under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act. For more information and to apply, click here.

 

Student Opportunities

Internship: Native American Fish and Wildlife Society
Application Deadline April 9. The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society (NAFWS) is recruiting to employ a Native American or Alaska Native, junior or senior level undergraduate or graduate student majoring in Conservation Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice, Wildlife, Natural Resources or a related field to complete an internship. The internship is for a period not to exceed a total of 1,000 work hours at a pay rate of $15.00 per hour. Telework is approved. Additionally, the Intern may receive opportunities to travel to and attend the NAFWS National Conference, a NAFWS Regional Conference, a Staff Workshop, a Summer Youth Practicum (SYP) or other training in accordance with Center for Disease Control, and Tribal and State health and safety recommendations. Learn more and apply.

 

2021 Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress
Application Deadline April 30. Join students from across the country to discuss community adaptation and related environmental issues impacting Native peoples. The mission of the Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress (NYCALC) is to develop future conservation leaders with the skills, knowledge, and tools to address environmental change and conservation challenges to better serve their schools and home communities.

In order to apply, students must be citizens of a federally recognized Tribal Nation and have reliable internet access.

For more information on this opportunity click here. For information on how to apply click here.

 

Graduate Student Scholarship Opportunity: Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership. The Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at the State University of New York (SUNY)
Applications accepted on a rolling basis (but note SUNY fall/spring application deadlines). Graduate Study Opportunity Integrating Indigenous and Scientific Knowledges for Environmental Sustainability. The Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at the State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science & Forestry is recruiting students for graduate study in diverse environmental sciences from ecology, sustainability, conservation biology to restoration and environmental engineering. As a member of the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership, the program provides funding for full tuition and stipends for Native American students pursuing MS and PhD degrees. Applications are open so please join us in this exciting initiative. Additional information can be found online at https://www.esf.edu/nativepeoples or contact Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer at rkimmer@esf.edu.

Additional Resources

Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network

The Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network (NICRN) seeks to convene Indigenous peoples to identify threats to Indigenous self-determination and ways of life and to formulate adaptation and mitigation strategies, dialogues, and educational programs that build Indigenous capacities to address climate-related issues. This website provides the latest tools and resources for Indigenous peoples and scientists to work together towards meeting the current challenges of climate change.  To go to the NICRN website, click here.

The Tribal Adaptation Menu (TAM)

The Tribal Adaptation Menu (TAM) is an extensive collection of climate change adaptation actions for natural resource management, organized into tiers of general and more specific ideas. While this first version of the Menu was created based on Ojibwe and Menominee perspectives, languages, concepts and values (hence its name in language–Dibaginjigaadeg Anishinaabe Ezhitwaad), it was intentionally designed to be adaptable to other Indigenous communities, allowing for the incorporation of their language, knowledge and culture.  The TAM authors and team provide culturally-supportive climate change adaptation planning workshops.  For more information see here.  

Bureau of Indian Affairs: Tribal Resilience Program        

The BIA Tribal Resilience Program (TRP) provides federal-wide resources to Tribal Nations to build capacity and resilience through leadership engagement, delivery of data and tools, training and Tribal capacity building. Direct funding supports Tribal Nations, Tribal consortia, and authorized Tribal organizations to build resilience through competitive awards for Tribally designed resilience training, adaptation planning, vulnerability assessments, supplemental monitoring, capacity building, and youth engagement. The resilient ocean and coastal management effort supports planning, science and tools, and capacity for coastal Tribal Nation’s ocean management, including the Great Lakes.  For more information, see here.

Tribal Climate Change Guide

Tribal Climate Change Funding Guide is intended to provide up-to-date information on grants, programs and plans that may assist Tribal Nations in addressing climate change through a broad range of sectors. We will update this guide regularly, so please check back often. If you have questions or updates for this guide, email: kathy@uoregon.edu. Please note that for entries that are accepting applications continuously, the grant deadline column will list “12/31/2017” as the grant deadline. This ensures that those grants will appear immediately after those grants with a set deadline.  To go to the Tribal Climate Change Guide, click here.

Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP): Tribal Climate Change Program    

ITEP’s Climate Change Program is a resource for Tribal Nations and Tribal environmental and other program staff for climate change adaptation support.  The ITEP Climate Change Program provides climate change adaptation planning workshops and trainings via webinar and in-person.  For more information see ITEP’s Climate Change Program webpage here

11th Annual Rooted in the Mountains Symposium – Ama: The Sacredness of Water (Integrating Indigenous Knowledge, Language, Health & Environment)

April 8-9, 2021. Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC. Rooted in the Mountains is an annual symposium that intersects traditional and local knowledge with health and environmental issues. Join the keynote speakers and panelists for an interdisciplinary discussion of water during the 11th Annual Rooted in the Mountains Symposium. This full two-day symposium will occur on the WCU campus with panels and keynoters. Participants leave the symposium with a new sense of urgency and tools to use in valuing our common ground.  Learn more and register HERE.

 

Webinar Series: Webinar #1 – USDA APHIS: Overview of Emergency Response Plan Outreach and Training to Tribal Nations

April 14, 2021 at 1:00 PM ET (12 PM Central). An introduction of Indian Nation Conservation Alliance (INCA), United South and Eastern Tribes (USET), Wisconsin Tribal Conservation Advisory Council (WTCAC), and Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Launching monthly Emergency Response Preparedness (ERP) webinar series. Starting with an overview of ERP outreach and training through a cooperative partnership with intertribal ag/natural resource organizations. Intertribal organizations brief overview and involvement within the cooperative. partnership. Join the webinar

 

Summit: Shifting Seasons 3

April 19-21, 2021. With a special Earth Day event on April 22. UPDATE: This has been reworked to a virtual gathering for the same dates as previously described. The 3rd Shifting Seasons Summit will include climate adaptation training sessions tailored to the needs and capabilities of Tribal Nations but will focus on the development of in-depth case studies based on existing Tribal adaptation work in the Northeast region. This summit would also include relevant Tribal climate change initiatives developed outside of the Northeast by capacity-building organizations, academic institutions and Tribal Nations who have approved climate adaptation plans, thus creating continued network building opportunities. The latest information on this event can be found HERE.

 

Conference: National Adaptation Forum

April 26-28, 2021. Atlanta, GA. This event will gather the adaptation community to foster knowledge exchange, innovation and mutual support for a better tomorrow. Join adaptation practitioners from around the country who are focused on moving beyond adaptation awareness and planning to adaptation action. For more information see here.

 

Webinar: Refugia are important but are they connected?
Mapping well-connected climate refugia for species of conservation concern in the Northeastern U.S.

Speaker: William DeLuca, National Audubon Society
May 5, 2021 at 12:00 PM ET. As the climate continues to change, vulnerable wildlife species will need specific management strategies to help them adapt to these changes. One such strategy focuses on the concept of refugia, areas that are buffered from the impacts of climate change and therefore remain suitable habitats for vulnerable species over time. Refugia stand in contrast to other habitats, which are impacted by climate change and may become unsuitable for vulnerable species. When wildlife managers are considering protecting land for these species, they sometimes prioritize locations that are predicted to be climate refugia. Rarely can those managers consider, however, the overall accessibility of refugia locations for vulnerable species, which are often unwilling or unable to migrate across landscape features such as wetlands, steep lopes, and developed areas. What good is it, then, to protect climate refugia if the species we are trying to protect cannot access those locations? This webinar will provide an update on work we are undertaking regarding 10 vulnerable species and refugia locations for these species. Our project identifies refugia locations for each of the species under consideration, maps how well each refugia location is connected to other refugia locations, and also maps locations that are most critical to connect current habitat to future climate refugia. This information will allow town, state and federal officials both to prioritize land that will serve as refugia in the future and ensure that it will be accessible to species that are likely to need it. To join this webinar click here.

 

Conference: 2021 Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference

Postponed until May 10-12, 2021. Durham, NC. The Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference has been postponed to May 10–12, 2021, due to concerns associated with the novel coronavirus pandemic. The CISA team and conference planning committees agree that this postponement will help to ensure the health and safety of our participants. We are especially grateful to our first responders and health care professionals who are on the frontlines, helping to save the lives of so many. We look forward to convening the network in-person next spring. For more information see here

 

Workshop: Wildfire and the Biosphere Innovation Lab

Application Deadline March 1 (Lab will occur May 17-19, May 21, and May 26, 2021). The Wildfire and the Biosphere Innovation Lab will bring together experts from a wide variety of fields to ideate and refine a strategic framework, to envision new projects related to wildfire and the biosphere, and to develop new research collaborations. Participants will also contribute to a white paper that will shape the direction of this developing research area. Applicants (~100) who demonstrate a collaborative spirit and represent a variety of different scientific disciplines, backgrounds and approaches will be selected to participateAt the end of the lab, participants will have formed new collaborations around innovative ideas. Opportunities for submission of project proposals across NSF will be highlighted. Applicants must be willing to commit to active engagement for the entire duration of the Innovation Lab.  More information and applications can be found here.

 

Conference: 2020 Local Solutions: Eastern Regional Climate Preparedness Conference  

May 24-25, 2021. Portland, ME. The 2020 Local Solutions conference will empower participants to take action steps that center climate equity. Climate equity ensures that all people have the opportunity to influence and benefit from climate resilience-building solutions. When we achieve climate equity, all communities will have the opportunity to thrive in the face of climate change, and race, ethnicity, income level, gender, and disability or immigration status will not be factors causing disproportionate vulnerability to climate impacts. For more information see here

 

Camp: ATNI Tribal Climate Camp

May 23-28, 2021. Anchorage, AK. Native Organization Host: Chugach Regional Resources Commission. In 2020, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Michigan State University, Portland State University’s Institute for Tribal Government, Chugach Regional Resources Commission, and the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center are collaboratively offering the Tribal Climate Camp (TCC) to support teams of Tribal leaders, climate change coordinators, planners, and program managers to build skills, gather information, and develop Tribal policy needed to address climate change impacts. To learn more about the event see here or contact Peggy Harris at DP@Seventhgenerationllc.com.

 

Virtual Workshop: Climate 101

June 15-16, 2021. Join the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center and U.S. Forest Service for a no cost, two-day virtual Climate 101 event, open to the Southern Region (Region 8) USFS ecologists, planners, tribal foresters, and natural and cultural resources staff. Included topics for this event: 1) An introduction to the Climate, 2) Carbon Sequestration, and 3) Air & Water Quality Resources. Registration is limited to 50 participants. Learn more and register.

 

Camp: Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress

June 26 – July 3, 2021 (For those students that applied for 2020 NYCALC, their applications will still be valid for 2021). National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, WV.  The Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress (NYCALC) is held each summer at the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in Shepherdstown, WV. The Congress includes a mix of urban and rural students from Tribal Nations and Indigenous communities located throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, and American Samoa. For more information and to apply see here.

 

Native Youth Community Adaptation And Leadership Congress

4-week program from July 5 through July 29. Occurring every Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday from 2pm-6pm ET. Note: Week 3 is offline for community engagement projects. NYCALC is a federal and non-governmental collaborative that invites Native communities to work together to address conservation challenges in a changing environment. NYCALC provides training in leadership principles and conservation for the next generation of Native leaders and their communities. We also provide opportunities for federal agencies to interface and engage with Native students. Registration for this event closes on April 12, 2021. To learn more about this event and to register, click here.

“NYCALC was an incredible place of growth, not only for me but for everyone involved.”
— Devon Parfait, 2019 Junior Faculty

 

Camp: USET Tribal Climate Resilience Camp

July 11-16, 2021, Schoodic Institute, Winter Harbor, ME. Tribal Nation Host: the Penobscot Nation. The USET Office of Environmental Resource Management (USET-OERM) will be holding a Tribal Climate Resilience Camp to support teams of Tribal Leaders, climate change coordinators, planners, and program managers to build skills, gather information, and develop Tribal policies and plans needed for Tribal Nations to address climate change impacts. Information about travel, lodging, and registration will be available soon. For more information contact, Casey Thornbrugh, USET Tribal Climate Science Liaison at CThornbrugh@USETINC.ORG.

 

 

La Niña conditions have set in for the Fall-Winter 2020-2021

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions have remained neutral through the summer, but with continued cooling of sea surface temperatures in the eastern Tropical Pacific, La Niña conditions have developed and are likely to continue impacting the US climate in the fall and winter. For more information see HERE.

Typically, La Niña conditions develop when sea surface temperatures in the eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean are cooler than their seasonal average.  This sets up an air circulation and jet stream pattern that favors more Atlantic hurricanes in the fall and a northerly Jet Stream or storm track favoring wetter than average conditions over the Pacific Northwest and the Midwest regions of the U.S.  La Niña conditions can also favor colder than average conditions during the winter in the Northern Great Plains.


See original map HERE               

See original map HERE

The opposite scenario is El Niño where conditions develop when sea surface temperatures in the eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean are warmer than their seasonal average.  This sets up an air circulation and jet stream pattern that favors fewer Atlantic hurricanes in the fall and in the winter, a southerly Jet Stream or storm track favoring wetter than average conditions over the southern tier of the U.S. and drier conditions in the Midwest. Sometimes warmer than average conditions also occur over the northern tier of the U.S. and Canada.  


See original map HERE.                       

See original map HERE

NOAA State of the Climate Report: Selected Climate Anomalies for 2020

Explanation of Maps:
The following maps were generated with observed and recorded data from weather stations across the continental United States compiled and displayed at the High Plains Regional Climate Center (HPRCC) located in Lincoln, NE.  The data uses a baseline or “climate normal” based on the 30-year climate averages for locations for the years 1981-2010. The standard 30-year climate averages will be updated again for the time frame 1991-2020 at the conclusion of year 2020.

NOAA Regional Climate Centers: Departure from Normal Temperature (°F) for Nov., Dec. 2020, & Jan. 2021
Late fall and winter 2020-21 experienced significantly warmer than average conditions (based on the years 1981-2010 climatological average) in the northern Great Plains, Great Lakes, and Northeast. Most of the US observed above average temperatures with the only exception being the Four Corners region of the Southwest and Southern Rockies.
For more information visit: https://hprcc.unl.edu/maps.php?map=ACISClimateMaps


NOAA Regional Climate Centers: Percent of Normal Precipitation (%) for Nov., Dec. 2020, & Jan. 2021
Late fall and winter 2020-21 experienced mostly drier than average conditions over most of the U.S. (based on the years 1981-2010 climatological average). Exceptions to this have been areas in the Central Great Plains, the Mid-Atlantic and South Florida.
For more information visit: https://hprcc.unl.edu/maps.php?map=ACISClimateMaps

Explanation of the Maps: NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues seasonal climate forecast maps.  These maps show the probabilities of unusually warmer/colder or wetter/drier seasons (relative to the 1981-2010 climate averages).  Specifically, “A” indicates chances are leaning toward above average, “B” indicates chances are leaning toward below average, and “EC” indicates that there are equal chances for above average, below average, or average conditions.  This information is generated from forecast models that use information on ocean, land, and atmospheric conditions such as sea surface temperatures (e.g. El Niño/La Niña conditions), presence/absence of sea ice or snow pack, and tropical weather patterns that can influence the location of the Jetstream and persistent areas of high/low pressure systems during a season.  Note: These are seasonal forecasts not predictions with 100% certainty. For example, a single hurricane with heavy rain or a week-long cold air blast/heat wave can impact the outcome of these forecasts. Please see this 2-minute video on how to interpret these maps.

Temperature & Precipitation Outlooks

Warmer than normal
Cooler than normal

Wetter than normal
Drier than normal

The late winter-early spring (February-March-April; FMA) 2021 temperature outlook is for the entire U.S. is leaning toward above average temperatures for most of the eastern and southern U.S.  The only region with an outlook leaning toward below average temperatures is the Pacific Northwest and southern Alaska.
The FMA 2021 precipitation outlook indicates a leaning toward above average seasonal precipitation for across the Northern Tier and the Ohio River Valley with leanings toward below average precipitation over the Southwest, Gulf Coast, and Florida.  This climate forecast is what may be expected during La Niña conditions as is occurring this winter in the Tropical Pacific.

Resolutions, Reports & Testimonies

2018:SPF 002 Maine Tribal Aquatic Ecosystems in Peril

2017:003 Authorization to Apply for Federal Funding for Natural Resource Management Programs

2016:037 Authorization for USET to Seek Federal Funding for BIA Tribal Climate Resilience Program

2016:034 Climate Change Impacts and Response Actions to Protect Human Health, Tribal Lands, Water and Natural Resources, Cultural Identity, and Sovereignty

2013:036 Authorization to Submit a Funding Proposal for Ethnobotanical Climate Change Adaptation Planning

2010:010 Support for Tribal Energy Capacity Development and Implementation

2011:055 Support the Formation of a National Tribal Water Advisory Committee


Testimony of United South and Eastern Tribes Sovereignty Protection Fund Submitted to the House Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous People of the United States for the Record of the February 12, 2019 Hearing, “The Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal Communities” February 26 2019

USET Climate Program Staff

Casey Thornbrugh is the Tribal Climate Science Liaison with United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) and is a citizen of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. Based at the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) at UMass-Amherst, Casey provides current climate science information to Tribal Nations in both the NE CASC and the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) regions. Casey also works with Tribal Nations to identify climate research needs and priorities and provide climate adaptation planning support.
cthornbrugh@usetinc.org
NE CASC Office – (413) 545-2619    USET Mobile: (615) 589-1629

Tyler Everett is a Forest Adaptation Technical Assistant working for USET to provide Climate Change and Forest  Adaptation planning technical support to Tribal Nations.  Tyler is a citizen of the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and is a forester specializing in forest pests, namely the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), which is impacting Black/Brown Ash (Fraxinus nigra) on Tribal lands in northern forests.  Tyler works remotely from Maine and assists with USET Climate Change trainings, writing retreats and other climate change adaptation events. He is also in the Ph.D. program at the School of Forest Resources at the University of Maine.
teverett@usetinc.org   

SC CASC and MW CASC Tribal Liaisons 

April Taylor is a Sustainability Scientist and Tribal Liaison with the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (SC CASC) and is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. April is based at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, OK and works with the goal of building research relationships with Tribal Nations in the SC CASC region.  She is actively involved with the training and development of resources for Tribal health and climate change vulnerability assessments.
April.Taylor@chickasaw.net
Office: (580) 235-7430   

                                  

Sara Smith is the Midwest Tribal Resilience Liaison with the College of Menominee Nation as part of the Sustainable Development Institute.  She is a direct descendent of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin. Sara is stationed at the US Forest Service’s Northern Forest Research Station on the University of Minnesota campus in St. Paul, Minnesota. Sara serves as a direct liaison between Tribal Nations in the Midwest and the NE CASC to identify and address research gaps in climate, natural, and cultural resources as well as improve outreach and capacity building. Sara also coordinates meetings of the Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network (NICRN).
ssmith@menominee.edu
Office: (651) 649-5134

February 2021 Story Archive

January 2021 Story Archive

December 2020 Story Archive

November 2020 Story Archive

October 2020 Story Archive

September 2020 Story Archive

July 2020 Story Archive

June 2020 Story Archive

May 2020 Story Archive

Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol II + SOCCR2

February 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

January 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

October 2019 Tribal Climate Headlines