Climate Change

New York Times Publishes Story on the Shinnecock Indian Nation and Resilience

The New York Times published a story on the work of the Shinnecock Indian Nation – Environmental Department and partners to restore the beaches in order to buffer from the impacts of coastal erosion and sea level rise.  The Shinnecock Indian Nation is a coastal Tribal Nation located on Long Island, New York near South Hampton.  Following the flooding and coastal erosion impacts from Hurricane Sandy in 2012, (as well as decades of erosion with sea level rise) the Shinnecock Indian Nation has worked diligently to restore coastal areas with dredged sand and planting of native beach grasses and other plants. These efforts extend and elevate the beach between Shinnecock Bay and the Shinnecock Indian Nation community.  Boulders placed along the low-tide line help to reduce further erosion by impeding wave action before the force of the waves reach the sand.  The story on the Shinnecock Indian Nation emphasizes the value of “nature-based solutions” to the impacts of climate change and sea level rise.  For the full story see here (note: a subscription may be required).

Science Friday: How Native American Communities are addressing Climate Change

As part of its “Degrees of Change” series, Science Friday explores how some Tribal Nations have developed climate change risk assessments and adaptation plans.  This podcast streamed on February 7, 2020.  The speakers include Dr. Kyle Whyte of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and a professor and Timnick Chair of Philosophy and Community Sustainability at Michigan State University; Ryan Reed, a citizen of the Hoopa Valley Tribe and an undergraduate in Environmental Science at the University of Oregon; and James Rattling Leaf, a citizen of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the Tribal Engagement Leader for the Great Plains Water Alliance.  This podcast can be heard here.   

NOAA unveils an expanded and enhanced Climate Explorer

An expanded and redesigned version of NOAA’s online, open-source Climate Explorer tool has been released to improve support for local planners, policy leaders, and facility and resource managers. The tool gives people a way to explore conditions projected for their locations in the coming decades.  Some of the highlights of the tool include: (1) mobile-friendly options, allowing tablet and smartphone users to check future climate projections for their locations, (2) new maps to show projections of annual averages for diverse temperature and precipitation variables, as well as the four monthly averages used to represent each season, and (3) maps for all temperature variables, so users can compare maps of historical and projected conditions across seasons and decades (from 1950-2100).  For a full description of the updates see here.

Auburn University Ph.D. Student Studies Ancient Southeastern Climates to understand the Modern Climate Change Implications for the Future

  Leah Travis-Taylor is a new Ph.D. student at the Auburn University Department of Geosciences. Leah completed her Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees at the University of Alabama and her studies focused on the behavior of ancient, extinct marine reptiles in the ecosystems that sustained them during a past warm climate. Her research adds perspective on the implications of climate change on modern-day marine reptiles.  Leah’s grandmother is a citizen of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians in Alabama, and Leah is actively involved in SACNAS (Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science).  Now at Auburn University, Leah specializes in the study of ancient climates (paleoclimatology), and her research investigates past precipitation variability in the Gulf of Mexico region from evidence found in stalagmites.  Stalagmites are rock formations common in limestone caves, that form from material deposited from water dripped from the cave ceiling. Stalagmites are layered and can provide clues into changes in past hydrology and precipitation going back thousands of years.

Through the development of stalagmite records from caves in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean regions, Leah’s work will produce some of the oldest, highest-resolution records in these areas.  This can provide Tribal Nations in the Southeast region with more information on hydroclimate variability in order to mitigate climate change impacts from more intense events, such as droughts and flooding.

USET Holds Climate Adaptation Plan Writing Retreat at NOAA Fisheries

USET Tribal Climate Science Liaison, Dr. Casey Thornbrugh, partnered with Adaptation/Insight Founder, Dr. Jennie Hoffman to hold a Climate Adaptation Plan Writing Retreat.  The writing retreat was graciously hosted by the NOAA Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office (NOAA-GARFO) in Gloucester, Massachusetts.  The goal of the writing retreat was to assist Tribal professional/technical staff to complete written drafts of their Tribal Nation’s Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments or Adaptation Plans or to update existing plans.This year’s writing retreat included a preparation webinar, which was attended by Tribal staff from the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe. The in-person writing retreat took place at NOAA-GARFO, December 10-12 and included participation from staff from the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and remote participation from the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah).  BIA Pathways and USET Graduate Student Intern, Tyler Everett, citizen of the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, also provided comments and technical support on the climate adaptation drafts during the retreat.  The retreat concluded with a tour of NOAA GARFO’s Seafood Inspection, Sustainable Fisheries, and Protected Resources divisions.  The tour was led by NOAA-GARFO Tribal Liaison, Ellen Keane.  Shown in the photo left-to-right are Dr. Jennie Hoffman, Founder of Adaptation/Insight; Patricia Cronkhite, Citizen of the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and Community Health Navigator; Dr. Dena Winslow, Tribal Planner for the Aroostook Band of Micmacs; Dr. Casey Thornbrugh, USET Tribal Climate Science Liaison; and Ellen Keane, NOAA-GARFO Tribal Liaison.  

        

The College of the Menominee Nation Continues the Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshop Series

The College of the Menominee Nation Continues the Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshop Serieshe College of Menominee Nation, a Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) consortium institution, recently partnered with the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science (NIACS) and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) to host the fourth in a series of Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshops that commenced in early 2019 and will continue throughout 2020. The most recent workshop was held from October 22-24, 2019 in Keshena, Wisconsin and was attended by citizens and technical staff from Tribal Nations in the Great Lakes region as well as participants from the Northeast and Southeast.  These events have been organized to help Tribal natural resource managers identify priorities, challenges, and areas of concern as they create action plans for adaptation and resilience.  More Tribal Adaptation Menu Workshops are currently being planned for 2020 across the Midwest and Northeast. For more information, please contact NE CASC Tribal Liaison Sara Smith at ssmith@menominee.edu.

SE CASC Science Symposium in New Orleans hears Presentations from Tribal Nation Environmental Staff, Students and Community Representatives

The Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) held its Regional Science Symposium November 12-15, 2019 in New Orleans, LA.  The Symposium consisted of several topic tracks including Coastal Resilience, Ecosystem Services, Grassland Landscapes, Wildland Fire and Adaptation, and Cultural Resource Management.  Tribal Environmental/Natural Resources staff presentation topics included Rivercane Restoration efforts and youth engagement from the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and Climate Adaptation in the southern Appalachians from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.  Students and Community Representatives from the United Houma Nation and the Atakapa-Ishak Chawasha Tribe of the Grand Bayou Indian Village in Louisiana also presented on Community Resilience in the face of sea level rise and storm surge impacts.  The Tribal Climate Science Liaison with United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) and the Northeast/Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Centers (NE/SE CASCs) also gave an oral and poster presentation on Tribal engagement and adaptation.      

Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe Announces Cooperative Agreement for State-Tribal Environmental Collaboration
The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (SRMT) recently signed a cooperative agreement that will accelerate restoration of natural resources and traditional Native American uses within the Saint Lawrence River Area of Concern (AOC). This agreement is the first of its kind across the United States portion of the Great Lakes and provides a new roadmap for coordinating studies and restoring natural and cultural resource uses between the two government agencies, while recognizing their unique jurisdictions and shared interests, according to the announcement from the DEC. Read more here.

Kivalina joins Tribal Nations in Louisiana in a Formal Complaint to the United Nations about Coastal Erosion
The Alaska Native Community of Kivalina has joined the Grand Caillou/Dulac Band of Biloxi Chitimacha Choctaw Tribe, Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians of Louisiana, the Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe and the Atakapa-Ishak Chawasha Tribe of the Grand Bayou Indian Village in a compliant to the U.N. that the U.S. has “failed to protect the human rights of Tribal Nations in Louisiana and Alaska, who are being forcibly displaced from their ancestral lands.”  Read more here.

Presentation on Tribal Nation Climate Adaptation Work given at Bowdoin College on April 1st
A seminar will be given to examine the recent work among the federal government, universities, and Tribal Nations and Indigenous communities in preparing for climate adaptation work. Guests speakers are Aranzazu Lascurain from the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC), John Daigle of the University of Maine and citizen of the Penobscot Nation, and Gabriel Frey and Suzanne Greenlaw from the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance. The presentation will be April 1st at 4:30 p.m. in the Roux Center.  For more information see here.

Funding Opportunities and Resources

NFWS National Coastal Resilience Fund 2020 Request for Proposals
Pre-proposal applications are due April 8 (Invited full proposals will be due June 25). The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) is pleased to announce the National Coastal Resilience Fund Request for Proposals (RFP) for 2020. NFWF will make investments to restore and strengthen natural systems so they can protect coastal communities from the impacts of storms, floods, and other natural hazards and enable them to recover more quickly and enhance habitats for fish and wildlife.  For information pertaining to projects in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions (Maine to Virginia) contact Claire Flynn – Claire.Flynn@nfwf.org. For projects in the Southeastern and Gulf regions (North Carolina to Texas) contact Suzanne Sessine – Suzanne.Sessine@nfwf.org. For more information click here.

Department Homeland Security FY 2020 Preparedness Grants
Applications due April 15, 2020. Preparedness and other grant programs support our citizens and first responders to ensure that we work together as a nation to build, sustain and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from and mitigate all hazards. These grants support our grantees develop and sustain capabilities at the state and local, Tribal, and territorial levels and in our nation’s highest-risk transit systems, ports and along our borders to prevent, protect against, respond to, recover from and mitigate high-consequence disasters and emergencies. Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications by April 8, 2020. For more information go to www.dhs.gov or www.fema.gov. or click here.

Tribal Wildlife Grants Program FY 2020
Applications due May 4, 2020. The Tribal Wildlife Grants (TWG) program was created to support the development and implementation of programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitats and species of Tribal cultural or traditional importance, including species that are not hunted or fished. The TWG program provides opportunities for federally recognized Tribal Nations to engage in fish and wildlife conservation efforts on their lands, many of which are also located adjacent to significant fish and wildlife populations, allowing for hunting and fishing opportunities on and off Tribal lands. For more information and to apply, click here.

DOC EDA FY2019 EDA Disaster Supplementals
 Applications are accepted on a continuing basis and processed as received. This investment assistance will help communities and regions devise and implement long-term economic recovery strategies through a variety of non-construction and construction projects, as appropriate, to address economic challenges in areas where a Presidential declaration of a major disaster was issued under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act. For more information and to apply, click here.

DOE FOA Energy Infrastructure Deployment on Tribal Lands – 2020
This FOA is intended to promote energy independence, economic development and with the ancillary benefit of providing employment on Tribal Lands through the use of commercially warrantied energy technologies that Native Americans and Alaska Natives believe are best suited to meet their needs, their location, and their available energy resources. For more information on the FOA, click here.

2020 Fish Passage Program
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis from October 1, 2019- September 3, 2020. The National Fish Passage Program (NFPP) is a voluntary program that provides direct technical and financial assistance to partners. The program works in partnership to provide fish (and other aquatic organisms) passage and restore aquatic connectivity for the benefit of federal trust resources. In doing so, the program aims to maintain or increase fish populations in order to improve ecosystem resiliency and to provide quality fishing experiences for the American people. To view the funding opportunity click here.

Student Opportunities

Camp: Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress
Application Deadline: March 31, 2020. June 26 – July 3, 2020, National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, WV.  The Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress (NYCALC) is held each summer at the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in Shepherdstown, WV. The Congress includes a mix of urban and rural students from Tribal Nations and Indigenous communities located throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, and American Samoa.  For more information and to apply see here.

Advancing Agricultural Science Opportunities for Native Americans (AASONA) Scholarship (2020-2021)
Applications are due March 31, 2020. The AISES Advancing Agricultural Science Opportunities for Native Americans (AASONA), which is a scholarship for students interested in or pursuing agriculture related STEM degrees, with an eventual career in agriculture and/or ranching. Students receiving this scholarship must agree to becoming a part of a cohort of other Native students in the same field. Travel to the AISES National Conference and AISES Leadership Summit is required and travel scholarships are available for cohort members. Also included, is a mentorship with current Native farmers and ranchers with meetings both virtual and in person at the conferences. Participation in the mentorship opportunities is required for all scholarship recipients. Students in this program are eligible to apply for research awards to fund research related to farming, ranching, and related science. For more information, visit, click here.

Fellowship/Scholarship: 2020 Bullitt Environmental Fellowship
Applications are due April 1, 2020. The Bullitt Environmental Fellowship is an award that provides a currently enrolled graduate student with a $100,000 prize over a two-year span of time to advance a project, engage in creative thinking, or spur action to address a specific environmental issue that furthers the Bullitt Foundation’s mission, outreach and impact in the Emerald Corridor. For more information and to apply, click here.

Graduate Application & Networking Opportunity: AGU Bridge Program
Student applications are due April 15, 2020. The AGU Bridge Program is committed to increasing representation of Hispanics, African Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians in geoscience graduate programs. The ideal candidate for this program will be a current or former undergraduate geoscience student who demonstrates the commitment, drive, and potential to complete a rigorous graduate program in the geosciences, but for various reasons, does not have the necessary coursework, research experience, or guidance to gain admission to a geoscience graduate program. For more information and to apply, please visit: https://www.agu.org/bridge-program. For questions, contact Pranoti Asher at: pasher@agu.org or Nakita Dolet at: ndolet@agu.org.

Graduate Student Scholarship Opportunity: Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership. The Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at the State University of New York (SUNY)
Applications accepted on a rolling basis (but note SUNY fall/spring application deadlines). Graduate Study Opportunity Integrating Indigenous and Scientific Knowledges for Environmental Sustainability. The Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at the State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science & Forestry is recruiting students for graduate study in diverse environmental sciences from ecology, sustainability, conservation biology to restoration and environmental engineering. As a member of the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership, the program provides funding for full tuition and stipends for Native American students pursuing MS and PhD degrees. Applications are open so please join us in this exciting initiative. Additional information can be found online at https://www.esf.edu/nativepeoples or contact Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer at rkimmer@esf.edu.


Upcoming Events, Webinars, and Trainings (listed in order by date)

 

The 2020 USET Sovereignty Protection Fund (SPF) Impact Week Meeting

The USET Sovereignty Protection Fund (SPF) Impact Week Meeting scheduled for March 16-19 has been canceled until later this year.  USET is tentatively looking to reschedule the meeting for the week of September 27-October 1.  If these dates are firmed up, this meeting will serve as both the 2020 USET SPF Impact Week and the Annual Meeting. For more updates on the USET SPF Impact Week see here.

 

WEBINAR: Forest Adaptation Webinar Series: Warming Winters

 March 19, 2020. 12-1 PM Eastern (11 AM – 12 PM Central).  The Northern Institute for Applied Climate Science and the Forest Stewards Guild are hosting a new webinar series focused on forests and climate change adaptation. Each session will first explore the latest scientific information from someone actively researching the issue, followed by an example of a real-world management project. To past webinar recordings and register for upcoming webinars, click here.

 

WEBINAR: Financing Climate Mitigation and Resilience: Lessons from Hawaii

March 20, 2020. 1:30 PM Eastern (12:30 PM Central). The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) invites you to a briefing on innovative efforts to finance and implement climate change mitigation and resilience projects. Featuring a panel from Hawaii, the briefing will explore steps the state is taking to reach carbon neutrality and run on 100 percent renewable energy by 2045.  For more information and to register click here

 

WEBINAR: A Guide to Understanding the Tribes and Indigenous Peoples Chapter of the NCA4


March 25, 2020. 12-1 PM Eastern (11 AM – 12 PM Central).  As part of its Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) webinar series, the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) will be hosting a webinar on the Tribes and Indigenous Peoples Chapter (Chapter 15) of the NCA4. The presenters will be Rachael Novak (Diné), Bureau of Indian Affairs – Tribal Resilience Program Coordinator and Federal Coordinating Lead Author for NCA4 Chapter 15 and Casey Thornbrugh (Mashpee Wampanoag), Tribal Climate Science Liaison with the United South and Eastern Tribes.  For more information see here.  To register click here.

 

NE CASC Workshop: Biological Thresholds in the Context of Climate Adaptation

April 1-2, 2020. This meeting has been postponed until further notice.

 

WEBINAR Series: ITEP Online Facilitated Cohort Workshop Climate Change 202: Develop or Update a FEMA Tribal Hazard Mitigation Plan

Apply by April 2, 2020. Work in a facilitated cohort group to develop or update a Tribal Hazard Mitigation Plan based on FEMA’s requirements. From October 2020 – September 2021, ITEP will offer a more advanced, mainly web-based course. This course will support individual Tribal Nation’s hazard mitigation planning through peer-to-peer learning and knowledge exchanges in a facilitated cohort focused on the process of developing or updating a Tribal Hazard Mitigation Plan. Click here to register or to view the course description. Email Karen.Cozzetto@nau.edu for further questions.

 

Conference: 8th Annual Rising Voices Workshop

The 8th Annual Rising Voices Workshop originally planned for April 29-May 1 has been postponed and will be rescheduled for Fall 2020 or Spring 2021 if necessary. The workshop will still be held in the same location on Lummi lands, and with the same focus on “climate resilience through intergenerational and place-based knowledges.”  Please note that there will not be a new application process, and those who previously applied will have their applications rolled over for the rescheduled dates.  For more information please see here.

 

Conference: 38th Annual Native American Fish and Wildlife Society National Conference

The 38th Annual Native American Fish and Wildlife Society (NAFWS) National Conference planned for May 4-8, 2020 at the Miccosukee Resort and Gaming, Miami, FL has been postponed and will be rescheduled for Fall 2020 (tentatively for the week of November 15th).  The National Conference will still be hosted by the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida and will be opportunity for Tribal natural resource managers, technicians, conservation law officers, government agencies, and others to receive training, network, share information, and discuss current technical information and legislative initiatives.  This year’s conference will include a day-long workshop on climate change impacts and adaptation strategies.  For more information see here.

 

Workshop: ITEP Climate Change 101: Introduction to Climate Change Adaptation Planning

The ITEP Climate Change 101 workshop scheduled for May 19-21, 2020 at the Blue Lake Casino, Sapphire Palace Event Center, Blue Lake, CA has been postponed.  Alternatives to in-person trainings, such as webinars and other e-learning platforms, are being assessed by ITEP staff. For all upcoming ITEP activities including trainings, professional assistance, mentoring, outreach events, and conferences (National Tribal Forum on Air Quality), ITEP will make announcements on the ITEP website, ITEP listserv, and the ITEP’s Facebook page.  Please check back regularly for updates.

 

Conference: ITEP National Tribal Forum on Air Quality

The ITEP National Tribal Forum on Air Quality (NTFAQ) scheduled for May 27-29, 2020 has been postponed.  Alternatives to in-person trainings, such as webinars and other e-learning platforms, are being assessed by ITEP staff. For all upcoming ITEP activities including trainings, professional assistance, mentoring, outreach events, and conferences (National Tribal Forum on Air Quality), ITEP will make announcements on the ITEP website, ITEP listserv, and the ITEP’s Facebook page.  Please check back regularly for updates.

 

Workshop: 8th Annual Indigenous Planning Summer Institute 2020

 June 1-6, 2020. College of the Menominee Nation, Keshena, WI: The College of the Menominee Nation – Sustainable Development Institute with the partners of the Indigenous Design and Planning Institute of the University of New Mexico, the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC), and Michigan State University will host the 8th Annual Indigenous Planning Summer Institute (IPSI). ISPE seeks to bring together a group of Indigenous participants and instructors to work collaboratively on building an understanding of how to implement Indigenous principles and practices of planning and design. ISPE will have a focus on Indigenous sustainability, responses to climate change, and environmental justice.  Please note the application deadline has passed.  

 

Camp: Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress

June 26 – July 3, 2020, National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, WV.  The Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress (NYCALC) is held each summer at the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in Shepherdstown, WV. The Congress includes a mix of urban and rural students from Tribal Nations and Indigenous communities located throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, and American Samoa.  For more information and to apply see here. The application deadline is March 31st, 2020.

 

Camp: USET Tribal Climate Resilience Camp

(Postponed to Summer 2021), Schoodic Institute, Winter Harbor, ME. Tribal Nation Host: the Penobscot Nation.      The USET Office of Environmental Resource Management (USET-OERM) will be holding a Tribal Climate Resilience Camp to support teams of Tribal Leaders, climate change coordinators, planners, and program managers to build skills, gather information, and develop Tribal policies and plans needed for Tribal Nations to address climate change impacts. Information about travel, lodging, and registration will be available soon. For more information contact, Casey Thornbrugh, USET Tribal Climate Science Liaison at CThornbrugh@USETINC.ORG.

 

Camp: ATNI Tribal Climate Camp

 August 9-14, 2020, Anchorage, AK. Native Organization Host: Chugach Regional Resources Commission. In 2020, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Michigan State University, Portland State University’s Institute for Tribal Government, Chugach Regional Resources Commission, and the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center are collaboratively offering the Tribal Climate Camp (TCC) to support teams of tribal leaders, climate change coordinators, planners, and program managers to build skills, gather information, and develop tribal policy needed to address climate change impacts. To learn more about the event see here or contact Peggy Harris at DP@Seventhgenerationllc.com.

 

Conference: ITEP National Tribal & Indigenous Climate Conference 

August 31 – September 4, 2020. St. Paul, MN. . The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) is honored to host the United States’ First Annual National Tribal and Indigenous Climate Conference (NTICC) along with support from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Tribal Resilience Program.  The NTICC is open to all US Tribal Nations and Indigenous Peoples from throughout the world, with an emphasis on including our Elders and Youth.  The NTOCC will convene experts on climate change, which will include a balance of Western Science and Traditional Indigenous Knowledges.  The topic areas will address climate impacts, assessments, adaptation, mitigation, implementation, and solutions.  More information can be found here.       

 

Conference: International Conference on Global Climate Change (ICGCC)

September 24-25, 2020. San Francisco, CA. This gathering aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Global Climate Change. For more information click here.

 

Summit: Shifting Seasons 3

October 6-8, 2020. Menominee Conference Center, Keshena, WI. Hosted by the College of Menominee Nation and respective partners. More information will be coming soon.

 

Summit: National Tribal Leadership Climate Change Summit

October 12-14, 2020. Hyatt Regency, 808 Howell St., Seattle WA.  The Affiliated Tribes of NW Indians, National Congress of American Indians, United South and Eastern Tribes, Pacific NW Tribes, and regional and national inter-tribal organizations are convening Tribal Leaders and staff from Tribal Nations, First Nations, and Indigenous communities from around the world. Our goal is to build on the knowledge and experiences related to climate change impacts and traditional knowledges, develop approaches that promote Tribal leadership in adaptation, mitigation, and resiliency, and foster pathways to influence climate policy regionally, nationally, and internationally. The Summit will include internationally renowned plenary speakers, participatory breakout sessions, youth sessions, climate solution exhibition, and more. The Summit will culminate in the development of a policy platform to ensure that Tribal Nations are leaders in moving climate policy forward in the United States and around the world. For more information including: registration, inquiry to be a speaker or presenter, agenda, youth participation, exhibits, march and rally, or sponsorship opportunities please contact: Don Sampson, ATNI Climate Change Project Director at DP@Seventhgenerationllc.com or call 541- 215-2753. On-line registration available March 1, 2020 at “atnitribes.org”.

Visualizing the Climate

NOAA State of the Climate Report: Selected Climate Anomalies for 2019

Explanation of Maps:
The following maps were generated with observed and recorded data from weather stations across the continental United States compiled and displayed at the High Plains Regional Climate Center (HPRCC) located in Lincoln, NE.  The data uses a baseline or “climate normal” based on the 30-year climate averages for locations for the years 1981-2010.  The standard 30-year climate averages will be updated again for the time frame 1991-2020 at the conclusion of year 2020. 

NOAA Regional Climate Centers: Departure from Normal Temperature (°F) for Dec. 2019, Jan. 2020, & Feb. 2020
Winter 2019-2020 experienced significantly warmer than average conditions (based on the years 1981-2010 climatological average)

over the entire eastern US.  The Northwest was also warmer than average. Only the Southwest and Central Rockiesexperienced cooler than average temperatures.
For more information visit: https://hprcc.unl.edu/maps.php?map=ACISClimateMaps

NOAA Regional Climate Centers: Percent of Normal Precipitation (%) for Dec 2019, Jan. 2020, and Feb. 2020.
Winter 2019-2020 experienced significantly wetter than average conditions (based on the years 1981-2010 climatological average) in the interior Southeast.  The coastal Pacific Northwest, parts of the Central Great Plains, and the Great Lakes regions also experienced somewhat wetter than average conditions.  California, portions of the Southwest, southern Texas, northern Florida and areas in the Inter-Mountain west remained drier than average. The Northeast was average-to-drier than average

Explanation of the Maps:

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues seasonal climate forecast maps. These maps show the probabilities of unusually warmer/colder or wetter/drier seasons (relative to the 1981-2010 climate averages). Specifically, “A” indicates chances are leaning toward above average, “B” indicates chances are leaning toward below average, and “EC” indicates that there are equal chances for above average, below average, or average conditions. This information is generated from forecast models that use information on ocean, land, and atmospheric conditions such as sea surface temperatures (e.g. El Niño/La Niña conditions), presence/absence of sea ice or snow pack, and tropical weather patterns that can influence the location of the Jetstream and persistent areas of high/low pressure systems during a season. Note: These are seasonal forecasts not predictions with 100% certainty. For example, a single hurricane with heavy rain or a week-long cold air blast/heat wave can impact the outcome of these forecasts. Please see this 2-minute video on how to interpret these maps.

Temperature & Precipitation Outlooks

The spring (March-April-May; MAM) 2020 temperature outlook is leaning toward above average temperatures for the Southwest, the Gulf Coast, Southeast, and the Northeast.  Northern and western Alaska is also leaning toward above average temperatures for the season. The highest probabilities for above average temperatures are in Florida, the Gulf Coast and parts of the Southwest. There is a leaning toward below average temperatures for the season for the Northern Great Plains.

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The MAM 2020 precipitation outlook indicates a leaning toward above average seasonal precipitation for the Northern Alaska and the central eastern U.S. Above average seasonal total precipitation is of highest probability in the Northern High Plains (i.e. eastern 2/3rds of Montana) and the lower Ohio River Valley and Cumberland Highlands of Kentucky and Tennessee. Below average precipitation is of the highest probability over the Southwest and California.

Explanation of the Maps:

NOAAs National Weather Service – National Operational Hydrologic Remoting Sensing Center (NOHRSC) takes daily ground-based, airborne, and satellite snow observations from all available electronic sources for the coterminous U.S. and displays spatial snow pack extent, snow depth, snow water equivalent (the amount of liquid water per unit of snow) as well as snow precipitation, snow melt and sublimation (snow evaporation).  These maps are updated daily.  The map below is the snow extent and depth as of 1 AM Eastern (12 AM Central) on March 1st, 2020

Note: The image below is a snapshot of snowpack on the morning of March 1st, 2020.  Daily snowstorms and warm spells can significantly alter the extent of snowpack spatially.  

Users are encouraged to view the animated seasonal evolution of snow pack from October 1st, 2019 through March 1st 2020, which can be viewed here:https://www.nohrsc.noaa.gov/nsa/js_animate.html?ts=24&year=2019&month=12&day=31&type=nsm_depth&region=National

Great Lakes Annual Maximum Ice Cover by Percent from 1973 to 2019

This shows the annual maximum ice cover in percent for the Great Lakes from 1973-2019. More information on Great Lakes ice cover can be found here.

NE/SE CASC Tribal Liaisons

Casey Thornbrugh is the Tribal Climate Science Liaison with United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) and is a citizen of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. Based at the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) at UMass-Amherst, Casey provides current climate science information to Tribal Nations in both the NE CASC and the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) regions. Casey also works with Tribal Nations to identify climate research needs and priorities and provide climate adaptation planning support.

Email: CThornbrugh@USETINC.ORG

Phone: NE CASC Office – (413) 545-2619    USET Mobile – (615) 589-1629

April Taylor is a Sustainability Scientist and Tribal Liaison with the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (SC CASC) and is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. April is based at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, OK and works with the goal of building research relationships with Tribal Nations in the SC CASC region.  She is actively involved with the training and development of resources for Tribal health and climate change vulnerability assessments.

Email: April.Taylor@chickasaw.net

Phone: Office – (580) 235-7430   

                                  

Sara Smith is the Midwest Tribal Resilience Liaison with the College of Menominee Nation as part of the Sustainable Development Institute.  She is a direct descendent of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin.  Sara is stationed at the US Forest Service’s Northern Forest Research Station on the University of Minnesota campus in St. Paul, Minnesota. Sara serves as a direct liaison between Tribal Nations in the Midwest and the NE CASC to identify and address research gaps in climate, natural, and cultural resources as well as improve outreach and capacity building.  Sara also coordinates meetings of the Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network (NICRN). 

Email: ssmith@menominee.edu

Phone: Office – (651) 649-5134

Tyler Everett is the BIA Pathways Student Intern working with Casey Thornbrugh to provide Climate Change Adaptation planning technical support to Tribal Nations.  Tyler is a citizen of the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and is a forester specializing in forest pests, namely the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), which is impacting Black/Brown Ash (Fraxinus nigra) on Tribal lands in northern forests.  Tyler works remotely from Maine and assists with USET Climate Change trainings, writing retreats and other climate change adaptation events.

Email: tyler.everett@maine.edu  

Archives

February 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

January 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

October 2019 Tribal Climate Headlines