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Tribal Resources and Tools


Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook
The Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, along with Adaptation International, created the Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook, which provides a framework for climate change adaptation planning in the context of existing tribal priorities. The Guidebook builds on the on-going climate-related work in tribal communities, directly considers the unique issues facing Indigenous communities, and identifies opportunities and guidance for incorporating Traditional Knowledges based on the Climate and Traditional Knowledges Workgroup’s Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges (TKs) in Climate Change Initiatives.
The Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook is designed to be useful for tribes at any stage of adaptation planning and with varying degrees of funding and staff capacity. The Guidebook is designed so that Tribal Nations can work through any applicable section and skip sections that are not applicable.

Tribal Adaptation Menu
Many climate adaptation planning tools fail to address the unique needs, values and cultures of Indigenous communities. The Tribal Climate Adaptation Menu, which was developed by a diverse group of collaborators representing Tribal, academic, intertribal and government entities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan, provides a framework to integrate Indigenous and traditional knowledge, culture, language and history into the climate adaptation planning process.  The Menu is an extensive collection of climate change adaptation actions for natural resource management, organized into tiers of general and more specific ideas. While this first version of the Menu was created based on Ojibwe and Menominee perspectives, languages, concepts and values, it was intentionally designed to be adaptable to other Indigenous communities, allowing for the incorporation of their language, knowledge and culture.


Nationwide Resources and Tools


The Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4)
The Global Change Research Act of 1990 mandates that the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) deliver a report to Congress and the President no less than every four years that “1) integrates, evaluates, and interprets the findings of the Program…; 2) analyzes the effects of global change on the natural environment, agriculture, energy production and use, land and water resources, transportation, human health and welfare, human social systems, and biological diversity; and 3) analyzes current trends in global change, both human-induced and natural, and projects major trends for the subsequent 25 to 100 years.”

The Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) fulfills that mandate in two volumes; Volume I, the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) andVolume II, Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States, which focuses on the human welfare, societal, and environmental elements of climate change and variability for 10 regions and 18 national topics, with particular attention paid to observed and projected risks, impacts, consideration of risk reduction, and implications under different mitigation pathways. Where possible, NCA4 Volume II provides examples of actions underway in communities across the United States to reduce the risks associated with climate change, increase resilience, and improve livelihoods.

This assessment was written to help inform decision-makers, utility and natural resource managers, public health officials, emergency planners, and other stakeholders by providing a thorough examination of the effects of climate change on the United States.



Climate Change Tree & Bird Atlases
Both of these online tools use a three-step model that attempts to capture information on current and projected future suitable habitat, likelihood of colonization, as well as additional factors such as tree pests and diseases of concern for certain species. With this information compiled the model works to project the responses of 134 tree species and 147 bird species to the effects of climate change based on multiple climate scenarios. This a great online tool for informing the management decisions being made by USET member Tribal Nations working tirelessly to sustainably manage their natural resources. The USFS has provided a short Quick Start Guide video for using and understanding this resource.


Edd MAPS
EDDMapS is a web-based mapping system for documenting invasive species and pest distribution. It is fast, easy to use, and doesn’t require Geographic Information Systems experience. Launched in 2005 by the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia, it was originally designed as a tool for state Exotic Pest Plant Councils to develop more complete distribution data of invasive species. Since then, the program has expanded to include the entire US and Canada as well as to document certain native pest species. EDDMapS’ goal is to maximize the effectiveness and accessibility of the immense numbers of invasive species and pest observations recorded each year. As of July 2020, EDDMapS has over 4.9 million records. EddMaps is being used by the following states in the USET region.


I-Map Invasives
iMapInvasives is an online, GIS-based data management system used to assist citizen scientists and natural resource professionals working to protect our natural resources from the threat of invasive species.


NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer
Use this web mapping tool to visualize community-level impacts from coastal flooding or sea level rise (up to 10 feet above average high tides). Photo simulations of how future flooding might impact local landmarks are also provided, as well as data related to water depth, connectivity, flood frequency, socio-economic vulnerability, wetland loss and migration, and mapping confidence.


USFS Forest Vegetation Simulator Online
Modeling the Forest: The Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) is a forest growth simulation model. It simulates forest vegetation change in response to natural succession, disturbances, and management. It recognizes all major tree species and can simulate nearly any type of management or disturbance at any time during the simulation. Outputs include tree volumes, biomass, density, canopy cover, harvest yields, fire effects, and much, much more.


Climate Explorer
Individuals, businesses, and communities of all sizes can use the Climate Explorer to understand how climate conditions in their locations are projected to change over coming decades. This information—derived from global climate models—can help people assess potential exposure, vulnerability, and risk to their assets.


NOAA Historical Hurricane Tracks
This tool is part of a NOAA-sponsored website focused on helping communities address coastal issues and has become one of the most-used resources in the coastal management community. The dynamic Digital Coast Partnership, whose members represent the website’s primary user groups, keeps the effort focused on customer needs. This tool, the Historical Hurricane Tracks, allows users access to an interactive mapping tool to view, analyze, and share historical hurricane tracking information.


US Army Corps of Engineers: Sea-Level Change Curve Calculator
This tool is provided by USACE and uses regionally specific data from NOAA’s sea-level gauges and graphically depicts the change in sea-level over time. The further ability of this tool is to project changes using several different equations to model different climate scenarios. This is a useful tool for gather graphical data to support the development of vulnerability assessments and climate adaptation plans.


Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center: U.S. Forest Change Assessment Viewer
The U.S. Forest Change Assessment Viewer is the interactive map component of the USFS program, ForWarn II. ForWarn II is a vegetation change recognition and tracking system that uses moderate resolution satellite (MODIS) data. It provides near real-time change maps for the continental United States (CONUS). Changes detected can inform your management decision to prepare for what the future might hold with disturbances looming nearby such as development, or insect outbreaks, etc. Access more information, a user guide reference to this resource, and help videos put out by the ForWarn program team.


The U.S. Drought Monitor
The U.S. Drought Monitor is a map released every Thursday, showing parts of the U.S. that are in drought. The map uses five classifications: abnormally dry (D0), showing areas that may be going into or are coming out of drought, and four levels of drought: moderate (D1), severe (D2), extreme (D3) and exceptional (D4).


Drought Risk Atlas
The National Drought Mitigation Center Drought Atlas project is intended to provide a wide range of decision makers with historical drought information and a web-based tool to visualize and assess their risk to drought. A station-based approach lets you find the station closest to your area of interest as well as a cluster of stations that statistically has shown similar precipitation attributes. The stations with the longest period of record, a minimum of 40 years, with the most complete record, were used to compute both the climatological and drought information to provide users with information from the best station data available, through 2017.


NOAA Data Access Viewer
This tool is part of a NOAA-sponsored website, https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/, focused on helping communities address coastal issues and has become one of the most-used resources in the coastal management community. The dynamic Digital Coast Partnership, whose members represent the website’s primary user groups, keeps the effort focused on customer needs. This tool, the Data Access Viewer, allows a user to search for and download elevation, imagery, and land cover data for the coastal U.S. and its territories. The data, hosted by the NOAA Office for Coastal Management, can be customized and requested for free download through a checkout interface. An email provides a link to the customized data, while the original data set is available through a link within the viewer


USGS Earth Explorer
The EarthExplorer (EE) user interface is an online search, discovery, and ordering tool developed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). EE supports the searching of satellite, aircraft, and other remote sensing inventories through interactive and textual-based query capabilities. Registered users of EE have access to more features than guest users.


U.S. Forest Service – Tribal Relations Program
The U.S. Forest Service established the first Tribal Government Program Manager position in the Washington Office in 1988, responding to identified needs and Executive direction. Subsequently, in 2004, the Office of Tribal Relations was formed as a permanent staff within the State and Private Forestry Deputy Area, to facilitate consistency and effectiveness in Forest Service program delivery to Tribes, and to institutionalize long-term consultative and collaborative relationships with tribal governments through new policy and direction. The current Office of Tribal Relations staff consists of six employees who serve as the Headquarters component of the Forest Service’s Tribal Relations Program. Field staffs comprise the other part of the program, and include the Regional Program Managers, Tribal Liaisons at the Forest level, and individuals in each of the Agency’s mission areas.


NOAA Climate.gov – The Climate Dashboard
NOAA Climate.gov provides science and information for a climate-smart nation. Americans’ health, security, and economic well-being are closely linked to climate and weather. People want and need information to help them make decisions on how to manage climate-related risks and opportunities they face.


PRISM Climate Group – Oregon State
The PRISM Climate Group gathers climate observations from a wide range of monitoring networks, applies sophisticated quality control measures, and develops spatial climate datasets to reveal short- and long-term climate patterns. The resulting datasets incorporate a variety of modeling techniques and are available at multiple spatial/temporal resolutions, covering the period from 1895 to the present. Whenever possible, we offer these datasets to the public, either free of charge or for a fee (depending on dataset size/complexity and funding available for the activity). Learn more about the datasets offered by PRISM.


TACCIMO: Template for Assessing Climate Change Impacts and Management Options
TACCIMO is a web-based information delivery tool that connects climate change science with forest management and planning needs. It is currently expanding to include information on agriculture, rangeland, and livestock planning as well. Science content in TACCIMO consists of findings (text quotations and figures) from peer-reviewed climate change literature.


USFS/NIACS Adaptation Menu
The second edition of Forest Adaptation Resources: Climate Change Tools and Approaches for Land Managers, like its predecessor, is intended to provide perspective, information, and tools to land managers considering how to adapt forest ecosystems to a changing climate. Adaptation strategy concepts and information can be found on page 30. The adaptation menu can be found on page 34.


GLIFWC Tribal Adaptation Menu
The Tribal Adaptation Menu provides a framework to integrate indigenous and traditional knowledge, culture, language and history into the climate adaptation planning process. The menu is an extensive collection of climate change adaptation actions for natural resource management, organized into tiers of general and more specific ideas. Created through collaboration between Tribal, academic, intertribal and government entities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan with guiding efforts from the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission with ideas that the menu may be useful in bridging communication barriers for non-Tribal persons or organizations interested in Indigenous approaches to climate adaptation and the needs and values of Tribal communities.


USDA USFS: Regional Forest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessments
Vulnerability is the degree to which a system is susceptible to, and unable to cope with, adverse effects of climate change, including climate variability and extremes. The identification of vulnerable species and ecosystems in the near term is a critical step in long-term planning. The USDA Regional Climate Hubs have worked together to produce ecoregional vulnerability assessments that can provide information to help identify the characteristics that put forest communities at greatest risk and can be used to inform natural resource management. Learn more about these publications and gain access to the nine ecoregional vulnerability assessments.


Silvics of North America
The silvical characteristics of about 200 forest tree species and varieties are described. Most are native to the 50 United States and Puerto Rico, but a few are introduced and naturalized. Information on habitat, life history, and genetics is given for 15 genera, 63 species, and 20 varieties of conifers and for 58 genera, 128 species, and 6 varieties of hardwoods.


Northeast

Region-wide Resources and Tools


Riparian Restoration Decision Support Tool
An innovative riparian planting and restoration decision support tool, funded by the Appalachian LCC, is now available to the conservation community of the Northeast region of the country. This user-friendly tool allows managers and decision-makers to rapidly identify and prioritize areas along the banks of rivers, streams, and lakes for restoration, making these ecosystems more resilient to disturbance and future changes in climate. It will also help the conservation community invest limited conservation dollars wisely, helping to deliver sustainable resources.


Northeast Regional Climate Center
The Northeast Regional Climate Center facilitates and enhances the collection, dissemination and use of climate data and information, as well monitor and assess climatic conditions and impacts in the twelve-state, northeastern region of the United States. Its activities are intended to further the economic efficiency and general welfare of public and private institutions and individuals in the region.


Connecticut


Connecticut DEEP – Climate Adaptation and Resilience
The Connecticut Institute for Resilience & Climate Adaptation (CIRCA) is a partnership of UConn and DEEP that focuses on increasing the resilience and sustainability of communities along Connecticut’s coast and inland waterways. These communities’ natural, built, and human environments are vulnerable to the growing impacts of climate change. CIRCA brings together a variety of experts to provide realistic solutions to this diverse set of problems. Also access the 2013 CT Climate Change Preparedness Plan and the 2010 Climate Change Impacts Report.


UMASS Amherst Climate System Research Center – CT Climate Report
This power point presentation put together by the UMASS Amherst Climate System Research system explores the impacts of climate change on Connecticut. Using multiple climate projects or scenarios trends in warming temperature, changes in seasonal weather, climate migration, sea level rise, changes in precipitation, and other extreme weather and heat events. An excellent source of information regarding climate change as it pertains to the state of Connecticut.


Connecticut DEEP – CT Forest Action Plan
The Connecticut Forest Action Plan acts as a guide for the Division of Forestry and hopefully inspires others to improve and protect Connecticut’s forest resources for future generations. Created in collaboration with many partners and stakeholders, the Forest Action Plan aims to identify issues and prioritize important areas, values, and needs. The Connecticut Forest Action Plan analyzes the current conditions and trends of forests in Connecticut and lays out strategies and action steps to best plan for the future of the forested landscape.


Connecticut DEEP – Invasive Species
Over the years, a variety of non-native species (plants, animals, and other organisms) have been introduced to Connecticut. Non-native species are those that are alien to the ecosystem that they have been introduced into and whose introduction causes or is likely to cause harm to the environment or human health. Some non-native species exhibit an aggressive growth habit and can out-compete and displace native species. These are referred to as invasive species and they are a serious problem in Connecticut and elsewhere.


Maine


Maine Natural Areas Program – Invasive Species
Access additional resources and learn more about the invasive species impacting the state of Maine. This resource is supported by the Maine Natural Areas Program (MNAP), within the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. MNAP, with landowner permission, inventories lands that support rare and endangered plants, rare natural communities and ecosystems, and outstanding examples of more common natural communities and ecosystems. MNAP also provides objective and comprehensive information to equip decision-makers with the necessary tools to make informed and responsible decisions.


Maine Forest Service – Invasive Threats to Maine’s Forests and Trees
Powered by the Maine Forest Service, a branch within the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry; This site provides information and guidelines for addressing the most prevalent wood borers, piercing-sucking insects, defoliators, disease, an much more impacting the forests of Maine. Information on quarantines and restrictions can also be found through this webpage.


University of Maine – Maine’s Climate Future (2020 Update)
This report, put together by partners on the federal, state, private sector, and academia levels, synthesizes scientific data to shed light on the future climate for the state of Maine. The future is difficult to predict and much uncertainty remains. Yet, every day, we make decisions using the best available information. These figures represent measured and modeled data across several scenarios of potential future warming. Here, we describe likely conditions in Maine’s future for these paths, based on the best available information. Humans have control over which path we follow.


Maine Climate Council – Scientific Assessment of Climate Change and it Effects in Maine
This document was developed by the Scientific and Technical Subcommittee of the Maine Climate Council to provide the best available scientific and technical information about climate change in Maine. This document is considered a “Working Document” because of the importance of delivering timely information to the Working Groups of the Maine Climate Council in support of their ongoing deliberations and critical timeline for recommendations in 2020. An excellent resource for deriving information needed in an adaptation plan or vulnerability assessment.


Massachusetts


Massachusetts State Hazard Mitigation & Climate Adaptation Plan
In the face of climate change, it is critical to build long-term resilience throughout Massachusetts by leveraging historical risk data and integrating that data with projected future climate conditions. The 2018 State Hazard Mitigation and Climate Adaptation Plan (SHMCAP) expands upon the previous planning efforts of the Commonwealth’s 2013 State Hazard Mitigation Plan and the 2011 Massachusetts Climate Change Adaptation Report.


Massachusetts Climate Change Adaptation Report – September 2011
Climate change is the greatest environmental challenge of this generation, with potentially profound effects on the economy, public health, water resources, infrastructure, coastal resources, energy demand, natural features, and recreation. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is committed to doing its part to mitigate and adapt to this challenge, recognizing the necessity of engaging in adaptation planning today by taking a close look at strategies that could help the state become more resilient and ready to adapt to climate change as it occurs.


Massachusetts DCR – Current Forest Health Threats
The current issues in forest health of the greatest concern to the DCR’s Forest Health Program include both introduced and native insects and diseases. Some pests are of statewide concern while others are present in specific geographic areas.


Massachusetts RCP – Invasive Plants
Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to the integrity of natural communities and also a direct threat to the survival of many indigenous species. As a result, we engage in efforts to identify the most problematic species and to manage them when and where it is possible.


Massachusetts Wildlife – Climate Action Tool
The Massachusetts Wildlife Climate Action Tool is designed to inform and inspire local action to protect the Commonwealth’s natural resources in a changing climate. It was developed for local decision-makers, conservation practitioners, large landowners, and community leaders across the state. With this tool, you can access information on climate change impacts and vulnerability of species and habitats, as well as explore adaptation strategies and actions to help maintain healthy, resilient natural communities based on your location and interests. Initial development of the tool is focused on fish and wildlife species, forests and forestry practices, landscape connectivity (with a focus on climate related impacts on roads and culverts), land protection, and conservation planning.


Rhode Island


Rhode Island DEM – Current Threats to Forest Health
The Rhode Island Department of Environment Managements Division of Forest Environment uses this webpage to inform the public on current issues in forest health of the greatest concern to the DEM’s Forest Health Program include both exotic/invasives and native insects and diseases. Some pests are of state concern while others are of regional or national concern.


RHODE ISLAND FOREST RESOURCES ASSESSMENT and STRATEGIES – June 2010
The Division of Forest Environment and the State Planning Council worked collaboratively to produce the RHODE ISLAND FOREST RESOURCES ASSESSMENT and STRATEGIES in June 2010. The plan has the following four objectives. “The objectives of the Statewide Planning Program are:(1) to prepare strategic and systems plans for the state (2) to coordinate activities of the public and private sectors within this framework of policies and programs (3) to assist local governments in management, and (4) to advise the Governor and others concerned on physical, social, and economic topics.


Narragansett Bay – Watershed Counts
Watershed Counts was initiated by the Coastal Institute at URI and the Narragansett Bay Estuary Program (NBEP) with the support of 60 partners throughout the bay and its watershed. WC was designed as a bridge project to report on the environmental health of Narragansett Bay and its watershed until such time as NBEP developed its updated status and trends report. With NBEP’s 2017 publication of The State of Narragansett Bay and Its Watershed along with plans for regular updates, Watershed Counts had served its intended purpose and subsequently ceased publication. Given the valuable data and associated case studies captured in these reports, this website will be retained as a resource.


The State of Narragansett Bay and Its Watershed – Technical Report
Today’s environmental status of Narragansett Bay (Bay) and the entire Narragansett Bay Watershed (Watershed) is the result of hundreds of years of human activities and environmental variability. Numerous organizations have worked together for decades to reverse trends of declining environmental conditions and to understand new threats such as those associated with climate change. Beginning in 2014, the Narragansett Bay Estuary Program brought together more than 50 practitioners from universities, organizations, and agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island to collaborate on the 2017 State of Narragansett Bay and Its Watershed report.


RESILIENT RHODY AN ACTIONABLE VISION FOR ADDRESSING THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN RHODE ISLAND
This strategy responds to changing weather and environmental conditions in Rhode Island caused by climate change and proposes bold yet implementable actions to better prepare the state for these impacts.


Mid-Atlantic

Region-wide Resources and Tools


Riparian Restoration Decision Support Tool
An innovative riparian planting and restoration decision support tool, funded by the Appalachian LCC, is now available to the conservation community of the Northeast region of the country. This user-friendly tool allows managers and decision-makers to rapidly identify and prioritize areas along the banks of rivers, streams, and lakes for restoration, making these ecosystems more resilient to disturbance and future changes in climate. It will also help the conservation community invest limited conservation dollars wisely, helping to deliver sustainable resources.


Northeast Regional Climate Center
The Northeast Regional Climate Center facilitates and enhances the collection, dissemination and use of climate data and information, as well monitor and assess climatic conditions and impacts in the twelve-state, northeastern region of the United States. Its activities are intended to further the economic efficiency and general welfare of public and private institutions and individuals in the region.


Southeast Regional Climate Center
The SERCC serves Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The mission of the SERCC is to provide timely, high quality, and pertinent climate data and information to public and private users in the region.


New York


New York Department of Environmental Conservation – Nuisance and Invasive Species
To combat the impacts of invasive species, DEC created and supports the Bureau of Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health (BISEH) within the Division of Lands and Forests. This group works across the state by providing expertise, assistance and action where invasive species are a threat.


New York Department of Environmental Conservation – New York’s Office on Climate Change
DEC’s Office of Climate Change works to connect environmental and energy policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase resiliency for the State, empower its communities, and provide low-carbon options for all New Yorkers.


New York Department of Environmental Conservation – Lands and Waters
Today New York has more forest than it has had in the past 150 years. New York’s forests serve as an important economic and recreational resource. Preserving and protecting our forests benefits local communities and industries, and the state as a whole. This site provides access to news, resources, and reports put out by the NYDEC regarding land, forest, and water resources across the state.


New York Climate Change Science Clearinghouse
The New York Climate Change Science Clearinghouse (NYCCSC) is a gateway for policymakers, local planners, and the public to identify and access documents, data, websites, tools, and maps relevant to climate change adaptation and mitigation across New York State. The goal of the NYCCSC is to support scientifically sound and cost-effective decision-making. The vision is a dynamic site where users can find information in multiple ways, including through interactive tools that use data from different sources.


Virginia


Virginia Invasive Species Management Plan 2011
The scope of the Plan covers all invasive species, both terrestrial and aquatic, from microbe to mammals, in Virginia. The purpose of the Plan is to provide a framework for state agency action to minimize economic, environmental, and human harm from invasive species by acting on the seven goals of coordination, prevention, early detection, rapid response, control, research, and education.


The Commonwealth of Virginia: The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types
This document lists the full classification hierarchy and includes the 82 ecological groups and 308 community types currently defined for Virginia. It is meant to function as a companion to the Division’s The Natural Communities of Virginia, Third Approximation web pages, which provide descriptions and illustrations of all Ecological Groups, as well as more detailed information about the methods used to develop the classification. Access the website and classification.


Virginia Department of Forestry: Forest Health Review 2020
This report is put together by the Virginia Department of Forestry and highlights the most recent happenings in forest health throughout the state.


NRDC: Climate Change and Health in Virginia
In this issue put out by the Natural Resource Defense Council, findings of how climate change are impacting human health in the state of Virginia is explored in detail.


Southeast

Region-wide Resources and Tools


Southeast Regional Climate Hub: LIGHTS Drought Monitoring Tool fact sheet
USDA Southeast Regional Climate Hub has developed a SERCH LIGHTS alert for drought that monitors NOAA monthly drought outlook forecasts. SERCH LIGHTS is an email alert service that updates extension professionals and other technical assistance providers about changing drought conditions in their location. A fact sheet about this resource is linked below where you can also subscribe to this service.


Hurricane Preparation and Recovery in the Southeastern United States – Pine Forest Landowners Guide
To help producers remain resilient and productive in the face of this threat, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Southeast Climate Hub developed this guide containing steps that can be taken to prepare for and recover from hurricane events.


USDA Climate Hubs: Salt Water Intrusion and Salinization in Coastal Forests and Farms
Coastal forests and farmlands in parts of the Southeast are being negatively affected by saltwater intrusion and soil salinization due to sea level rise, storms, tides, droughts, and water resources management. Elevated salinity levels cause crop yield declines, coastal forest loss, increases in salt-tolerant invasive species, eutrophication and marsh migration. Learn more about this threat to coastal forests and gain access to studies, reports, and guide books for addressing this threat.


Southeast Regional Climate Center
The SERCC serves Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The mission of the SERCC is to provide timely, high quality, and pertinent climate data and information to public and private users in the region.


Gulf of Mexico Alliance – Governors’ Action Plan III: For Healthy and Resilient Coasts
We, the Governors of the five U.S. Gulf States, recognize that the quality of life for citizens and visitors is culturally bound to the benefits provided by our natural resources. As the most productive body of water in the United States, the Gulf of Mexico has natural resources like no other, including rich and bountiful estuaries that provide 78% of our nation’s shrimp landings; white sandy beaches that provide nearly $10 trillion in annual wages; working waterfronts encompassing 13 of the nation’s 20 leading ports by tonnage; and a rich outer continental shelf and deep canyon area that provide 50% of the Nation’s oil reserves.


A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests By John H. Miller et al USDA
Invasions of nonnative plants into forests and landscapes of the Southern United States continue to spread and include new species, increasingly eroding forest productivity, hindering forest use and management activities, and degrading diversity and wildlife habitat. This book provides the latest information on how to organize and enact prevention programs, build strategies, implement integrated procedures for management, and proceed towards site rehabilitation and restoration.


Alabama


Impacts of Climate Change and Variability on Transportation Systems and Infrastructure: The Gulf Coast Study, Phase 2
Facility managers, transportation leaders, and elected officials are increasingly concerned about the resilience of transportation infrastructure to a range of threats, including the threats posed by climate change and extreme weather.


Alabama Forestry Commission – Publications
The Alabama Forestry Commission has compiled all their publication in one convenient, easy to navigate location. Publications range from brochures, formal and technical reports, to brief fact sheets that cover a wide range of forestry related topics from herbicides to invasive species.


Alabama Forestry Commission – Invasive Species
The introduction and spread of non-native invasive organisms have resulted in the degradation of native forests. The encroachment of these exotic animals, plants, insects, and pathogens can alter native plant composition and disrupt indigenous species regeneration that will ultimately reduce biodiversity. Invasive pests will cause economic and environmental harm to native forests. If not managed, the continuous spread and domination of invasive forest pests can result in the displacement of certain native species to the verge of being threatened, endangered or extinct.


Alabama Forestry Commission – Forest Insects and Diseases
Forest insects can have a significant impact on the health and mortality of trees. There are different types of insects that will attack trees such as wood borers, bark beetles, defoliators, meristem feeders, and sap consumers. Most native insects are periodic pests, appearing at epidemic levels every several years causing severe harm or mortality.


Florida


Georgetown Climate Center – Preparing for Climate Change in Florida
This page, put together by the Georgetown Climate Center, highlights the progress Florida is making to implement its statewide adaptation plan. Other resources from the Adaptation Clearinghouse, which have been developed and adopted to help Florida prepare for the impacts of climate change, are featured in the chart toward the bottom of the webpage.


Florida DACS – Florida Forest Service: Forests and Wildfire Publications
The Florida Forest Service has assembled all their publications on Forests and wildfire in one convenient location on their website.


Guide to the Natural Communities of Florida: 2010 edition
In 2007, with funding from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Division of State Lands, the Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI) began a process of updating the “Guide to the Natural Communities of Florida” (the Guide), which had been only slightly modified since it was first published in 1990 by FNAI and the Florida Department of Natural Resources (now FDEP).


Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: Florida’s Nonnative Fish and Wildlife
Nonnative species do not belong in Florida. Some do not cause many, if any, problems. Others, however, are invasive, meaning that they negatively impact native fish and wildlife, cause damage that is costly to repair, or pose a threat to human health and safety.


North Carolina


North Carolina Climate Risk Assessment and Resilience Plan – June 2020
From the mountains to the coast, North Carolina is a place of hardworking, resilient people and great natural beauty. In recent years we’ve faced unprecedented challenges, from hurricanes and flooding to a global pandemic and economic downturn. Climate change is also testing our mettle and affecting everyday life.


Georgetown Climate Center – Preparing for Climate Change in North Carolina
Since North Carolina just released the North Carolina Resilience Plan in June 2020, the Georgetown Climate Center has indicated that this linked webpage will be updated in the future with the progress the state is making in implementing the adaptation actions and goals set forth in the plan. Access other resources from the Adaptation Clearinghouse, which have been developed and adopted to help North Carolina prepare for the impacts of climate change.


North Carolina Forest Service – Publications
The North Carolina Forest Service has compiled all of their publications in a convenient, easy to navigate location on their web page. Access documents, plans, brochures and more on topics like Fire Control, Forest Management, Forest Health, and Invasive species.


North Carolina Forest Service – Invasive Plants
Invasive exotic plants are those plants transported outside their normal home ranges and cause damage or harm in their new location. In their new homes, these alien species are free from the natural competition, herbivores, insects and diseases that normally keep populations in check. Therefore many exotic species can spread rampantly, displace natural plant species and become nuisances. Invasive species are recognized as one of the leading threats to biodiversity and may impose enormous costs on forest managers.


South Carolina


Georgetown Climate Center – Preparing for Climate Change in South Carolina
South Carolina has not developed a statewide adaptation plan. The Georgetown Climate Center has assembled the resources from the Adaptation Clearinghouse, which have been developed by the state and localities to help communities prepare for climate change.


South Carolina Forestry Commission – Forest Health: Insect and Disease
The I & D Section has the responsibility for monitoring, reporting, and coordinating suppression of endemic pests affecting forest trees in South Carolina. I&D also works closely with Christmas tree growers, nurseries growing forest tree seedlings, seed orchards producing tree seed and urban areas with tree pest problems.


South Carolina Forestry Commission – Forest Health: Threats to South Carolina’s Forests
This forest health manual highlights some of the insect pests and diseases you are likely to encounter in South Carolina’s forests, as well as some threats that are on the horizon.


South Carolina Forestry Commission – Invasive Species of South Carolina’s Forests
The South Carolina Forestry Commission is proud to present this guide to some of the most common and problematic invasive species encountered in our state’s forests.


South Carolina Forestry Commission – South Carolina’s Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy
South Carolina is blessed with a rich diversity of forest resources. Comprising approximately 13 million acres, these forests range from hardwood coves in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains to maritime forests along the Atlantic Coast. Along with this diversity comes a myriad of benefits that these forests provide as well as a range of challenges that threaten their very existence. Access a plug-in about climate change on page 24 of this publication.


South Central

Region-wide Resources and Tools


Southern Regional Climate Center
The mission of the Southern Regional Climate Center is to increase the use and availability of climate information in the Southern region that comprises the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. SRCC personnel work closely with scientists from other regional and federal climate centers to enhance climate services and programs that provide a regional structure for climate applications. The long-term objectives of the SRCC are to collect, enhance and deliver climate data and products to the citizens and industries in its region, provide personalized service and outreach, and conduct applied climate research and development to enhance data quality, product utility, and promote a better understanding of the interaction between climate information and societal needs.


Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP) – Climate Tools
This webpage is powered by the Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program in partnership with NOAA and the SRCC. The link connects users to an assortment of climate related tools specific to the south central area. SCIPP is a South Central United States focused climate hazards and research program whose mission is to help communities build resilience to weather and climate extremes now and in the future. SCIPP focuses on climate challenges in Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and coastal Mississippi.


Gulf of Mexico Alliance – Governors’ Action Plan III: For Healthy and Resilient Coasts
We, the Governors of the five U.S. Gulf States, recognize that the quality of life for citizens and visitors is culturally bound to the benefits provided by our natural resources. As the most productive body of water in the United States, the Gulf of Mexico has natural resources like no other, including rich and bountiful estuaries that provide 78% of our nation’s shrimp landings; white sandy beaches that provide nearly $10 trillion in annual wages; working waterfronts encompassing 13 of the nation’s 20 leading ports by tonnage; and a rich outer continental shelf and deep canyon area that provide 50% of the Nation’s oil reserves.


A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests By John H. Miller et al USDA
Invasions of nonnative plants into forests and landscapes of the Southern United States continue to spread and include new species, increasingly eroding forest productivity, hindering forest use and management activities, and degrading diversity and wildlife habitat. This book provides the latest information on how to organize and enact prevention programs, build strategies, implement integrated procedures for management, and proceed towards site rehabilitation and restoration.


Louisiana


LA SAFE – Our Land and Water: A Regional Approach to Adaptation
During the next 50 years, Louisiana is projected to lose more land and wetlands along its coast than it can rebuild, even if restoration efforts are completed as currently planned. With less wetland buffer, the state’s coastal regions face increased storm surge and flood risk that will impact families and communities in ways large and small, acute and chronic.


Louisiana CPRA – 2017 Coastal Master Plan
Louisiana’s coast is a precious natural, economic, and cultural resource. It is an area rich in ecological abundance that supports world-class commercial and recreational fisheries and is home to an array of waterfowl, migratory birds, reptiles, and amphibians. It is an area that maintains five of the top 12 ports (by cargo volume) in the United States. It is a major energy supplier of our nation’s oil and natural gas. Above all, the Louisiana coast is home to more than 2 million people – nearly half of the state’s population. Our people have a deep and abiding love for their coast and a rich cultural heritage closely connected to the land and water. This complex and fragile ecosystem is disappearing at an alarming rate.


Louisiana Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy
The state of Louisiana is blessed with abundant natural resources. Commerce stemming from the State’s timber assets is second only to State’s petroleum and natural gas industry and provides thousands of jobs within the state’s top renewable industry. Abundant water, a sub-tropical climate, and high-quality soils form the foundation of the state’s ability to generate both excellent pine and hardwood stands.


Louisiana DAF – Forest Protection Division
The primary objectives of the Forest Protection Division are the detection, suppression and prevention of wildfires in the forestlands of Louisiana. There are 18.9 million acres of land under fire protection by the agency. Louisiana’s wildfire occurrence is “high” by regional and national standards. Without the effort and dedication of Office of Forestry personnel, the loss from wildfire could be catastrophic.


Mississippi


U.S. EPA – What Climate Change Means for Mississippi
In the coming decades, Mississippi will become warmer, and both floods and droughts may be more severe. Unlike most of the nation, Mississippi did not become warmer during the last 50 to 100 years. But soils have become drier, annual rainfall has increased, more rain arrives in heavy downpours, and sea level is rising about one inch every seven years. The changing climate is likely to increase damages from tropical storms, reduce crop yields, harm livestock, increase the number of unpleasantly hot days, and increase the risk of heat stroke and other heat-related illnesses.


Mississippi Forestry Commission – Invasive Species Programs
Mississippi is home to a number of invasive plants and insect species that pose a significant threat to our forests. Mississippi Forestry Commission is involved in several programs to help combat these invasive species.


Mississippi Forestry Commission – Invasive Plants
Read more about some of Mississippi’s most harmful invasive plants, including where they came from, the threats they pose, and the control methods used to mitigate them.


Mississippi Forestry Commission – Tree Diseases
Tree diseases are a significant threat to Mississippi’s trees. Diseases cause 45% of all mortality and degradation in our forests.


Texas


Georgetown Climate Center – Preparing for Climate Change in Texas
Texas has not developed a statewide adaptation plan. Other resources from the Adaptation Clearinghouse, which have been developed by the state and localities to help communities prepare for climate change. These resources have been assembled in one convenient place by the Georgetown Climate Center, along with links to climate adaptation resources for Texas like the “Texas 2017 Coastal Resiliency Master Plan,” and “Resilient Houston – City of Houston, Texas Resilience Strategy.”


Texas Coastal Resilience Masterplan – March 2017
From the mouth of the Rio Grande River to the Sabine River, the Texas shoreline is ecologically diverse and biologically productive. Its habitats maintain native plant and animal populations, provide nurseries, nesting and foraging areas for fish and wildlife, and reduce the impacts of coastal hazards.


Texas A&M – Forest Action Plan
The 2008 Farm Bill required each state to assess the forest conditions and trends within their boundaries, delineate priority forest landscapes, and identify the issues, threats, and opportunities facing these landscapes. Five primary issues were identified based on input from interested stakeholders from across the state 1) Urban Forest Sustainability 2) Central Texas Woodlands Conservation 3) Sustainability of Forest Resources in East Texas 4) Water Resources 5) Wildfire and Public Safety.


Union of Concerned Scientists – Texas Invasive Species
Various agencies have jurisdiction over different types of invasive species. Consequently, there has never been a comprehensive statewide tally and the total number of invasive species is still unknown. There are, at minimum, the following number of invasive species: 67 terrestrial plants, 12 aquatic/wetland plants, 10 mammals, 4 birds, 7 fishes, 11 insects, and 11 mollusks and crustaceans.