Climate Change Tools Information Sources

Climate Change
Tools & Information Sources

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The Climate Change Tree & Bird Atlas
Both of these online tools use a three step model that attempts to capture information on current and projected future suitable habitat, likelihood of colonization, as well as additional factors such as tree pests and diseases of concern for certain species. With this information compiled the model works to project the responses of 134 tree species and 147 bird species to the affects of climate change based on multiple climate scenarios. This a great online tool for informing the management decisions being made by USET member Tribal Nations working tirelessly to sustainably manage their natural resources. The USFS has provided a short “Quick Start Guide” video for using and understanding this resource at the following link: https://youtu.be/gEB47OsC8Vk
The Climate Dashboard – NOAA
NOAA Climate.gov provides science and information for a climate-smart nation. Americans’ health, security, and economic well-being are closely linked to climate and weather. People want and need information to help them make decisions on how to manage climate-related risks and opportunities they face.
The Climate Explorer
Individuals, businesses, and communities of all sizes can use the Climate Explorer to understand how climate conditions in their locations are projected to change over coming decades. This information—derived from global climate models—can help people assess potential exposure, vulnerability, and risk to their assets.
PRISM Climate Group – Oregon State
The PRISM Climate Group gathers climate observations from a wide range of monitoring networks, applies sophisticated quality control measures, and develops spatial climate datasets to reveal short- and long-term climate patterns. The resulting datasets incorporate a variety of modeling techniques and are available at multiple spatial/temporal resolutions, covering the period from 1895 to the present. Whenever possible, we offer these datasets to the public, either free of charge or for a fee (depending on dataset size/complexity and funding available for the activity). To learn more about understanding the datasets offered click PRISM Climate Group above. To access the data, click the picture.
Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program – Climate Tools
This webpage is powered by the Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program in partnership with NOAA and the SRCC. The link connects users to an assortment of climate related tools specific to the south central area. SCIPP is a South Central United States focused climate hazards and research program whose mission is to help communities build resilience to weather and climate extremes now and in the future. SCIPP focuses on climate challenges in Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and coastal Mississippi.
TACCIMO: Template for Assessing Climate Change Impacts and Management Options
TACCIMO is a web-based information delivery tool that connects climate change science with forest management and planning needs. It is currently expanding to include information on agriculture, rangeland, and livestock planning as well. Science content in TACCIMO consists of findings (text quotations and figures) from peer-reviewed climate change literature.
To explore this resource further click the picture above.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is a map released every Thursday, showing parts of the U.S. that are in drought. The map uses five classifications: abnormally dry (D0), showing areas that may be going into or are coming out of drought, and four levels of drought: moderate (D1), severe (D2), extreme (D3) and exceptional (D4).

USDA Southeast Regional Climate Hub has developed a SERCH LIGHTS alert for drought that monitors NOAA monthly drought outlook forecasts. SERCH LIGHTS is an email alert service that updates extension professionals and other technical assistance providers about changing drought conditions in their location. A fact sheet about this resource is linked where you can also subscribe to this service.

Modeling the Forest: The Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) is a forest growth simulation model. It simulates forest vegetation change in response to natural succession, disturbances, and management. It recognizes all major tree species and can simulate nearly any type of management or disturbance at any time during the simulation. Outputs include tree volumes, biomass, density, canopy cover, harvest yields, fire effects, and much, much more.

The U.S. Forest Service established the first Tribal Government Program Manager position in the Washington Office in 1988, responding to identified needs and Executive direction. Subsequently, in 2004, the Office of Tribal Relations was formed as a permanent staff within the State and Private Forestry Deputy Area, to facilitate consistency and effectiveness in Forest Service program delivery to Tribal Nations, and to institutionalize long-term consultative and collaborative relationships with Tribal governments through new policy and direction. The current Office of Tribal Relations staff consists of six employees who serve as the Headquarters component of the Forest Service’s Tribal Relations Program. Field staffs comprise the other part of the program, and include the Regional Program Managers, Tribal Liaisons at the Forest level, and individuals in each of the Agency’s mission areas.

US Army Corps of Engineers: Sea-Level Change Curve Calculator
This tool is provided by USACE and uses regionally specific data from NOAA’s sea-level gauges and graphically depicts the change in sea-level over time. The further ability of this tool is to project changes using several different equations to model different climate scenarios. This is a useful tool for gather graphical data to support the development of vulnerability assessments and climate adaptation plans.

NOAA Historical Hurricane Tracks
This tool is part of a NOAA-sponsored website focused on helping communities address coastal issues and has become one of the most-used resources in the coastal management community. The dynamic Digital Coast Partnership, whose members represent the website’s primary user groups, keeps the effort focused on customer needs. This tool, the Historical Hurricane Tracks, allows users access to an interactive mapping tool to view, analyze, and share historical hurricane tracking information.

The National Drought Mitigation Center Drought Atlas project is intended to provide a wide range of decision makers with historical drought information and a web-based tool to visualize and assess their risk to drought. A station-based approach lets you find the station closest to your area of interest as well as a cluster of stations that statistically has shown similar precipitation attributes. The stations with the longest period of record, a minimum of 40 years, with the most complete record, were used to compute both the climatological and drought information to provide users with information from the best station data available, through 2017.

The U.S. Forest Change Assessment Viewer is the interactive map component of the USFS program, ForWarn II. ForWarn II is a vegetation change recognition and tracking system that uses moderate resolution satellite (MODIS) data. It provides near real-time change maps for the continental United States (CONUS). Changes detected can inform your management decision to prepare for what the future might hold with disturbances looming nearby such as development, or insect outbreaks, etc.. For more information and a user guide reference to this resource click here where you will also find help videos put out by the ForWarn program team.

Hurricane Preparation and Recovery in the Southeastern United States – Pine Forest Landowners Guide
To help producers remain resilient and productive in the face of this threat, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Southeast Climate Hub developed this guide containing steps that can be taken to prepare for and recover from hurricane events.

NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer
Use this web mapping tool to visualize community-level impacts from coastal flooding or sea level rise (up to 10 feet above average high tides). Photo simulations of how future flooding might impact local landmarks are also provided, as well as data related to water depth, connectivity, flood frequency, socio-economic vulnerability, wetland loss and migration, and mapping confidence.

USDA Climate Hubs: Salt Water Intrusion and Salinization in Coastal Forests and Farms
Coastal forests and farmlands in parts of the Southeast are being negatively affected by saltwater intrusion and soil salinization due to sea level rise, storms, tides, droughts, and water resources management. Elevated salinity levels cause crop yield declines, coastal forest loss, increases in salt-tolerant invasive species, eutrophication and marsh migration. Learn more about this threat to coastal forests and gain access to studies, reports, and guide books for addressing this threat by clicking here.

NOAA Data Access Viewer
This tool is part of a NOAA-sponsored website focused on helping communities address coastal issues and has become one of the most-used resources in the coastal management community. The dynamic Digital Coast Partnership, whose members represent the website’s primary user groups, keeps the effort focused on customer needs. This tool, the Data Access Viewer, allows a user to search for and download elevation, imagery, and land cover data for the coastal U.S. and its territories. The data, hosted by the NOAA Office for Coastal Management, can be customized and requested for free download through a checkout interface. An email provides a link to the customized data, while the original data set is available through a link within the viewer

Northeast Regional Climate Center
The Northeast Regional Climate Center facilitates and enhances the collection, dissemination and use of climate data and information, as well monitor and assess climatic conditions and impacts in the twelve-state, northeastern region of the United States. Its activities are intended to further the economic efficiency and general welfare of public and private institutions and individuals in the region.

The SERCC serves Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The mission of the SERCC is to provide timely, high quality, and pertinent climate data and information to public and private users in the region.

The mission of the Southern Regional Climate Center is to increase the use and availability of climate information in the Southern region that comprises the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. SRCC personnel work closely with scientists from other regional and federal climate centers to enhance climate services and programs that provide a regional structure for climate applications. The long-term objectives of the SRCC are to collect, enhance and deliver climate data and products to the citizens and industries in its region, provide personalized service and outreach, and conduct applied climate research and development to enhance data quality, product utility, and promote a better understanding of the interaction between climate information and societal needs.

NOAA Data Access Viewer
This tool is part of a NOAA-sponsored website focused on helping communities address coastal issues and has become one of the most-used resources in the coastal management community. The dynamic Digital Coast Partnership, whose members represent the website’s primary user groups, keeps the effort focused on customer needs. The Data Access Viewer allows a user to search for and download elevation, imagery, and land cover data for the coastal U.S. and its territories. The data, hosted by the NOAA Office for Coastal Management, can be customized and requested for free download through a checkout interface. An email provides a link to the customized data, while the original data set is available through a link within the viewer.


The EarthExplorer (EE) user interface is an online search, discovery, and ordering tool developed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS).
EE supports the searching of satellite, aircraft, and other remote sensing inventories through interactive and textual-based query capabilities. Registered users of EE have access to more features than guest users.


EDDMapS is a web-based mapping system for documenting invasive species and pest distribution. It is fast, easy to use, and doesn’t require Geographic Information Systems experience. Launched in 2005 by the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia, it was originally designed as a tool for state Exotic Pest Plant Councils to develop more complete distribution data of invasive species. Since then, the program has expanded to include the entire US and Canada as well as to document certain native pest species. EDDMapS’ goal is to maximize the effectiveness and accessibility of the immense numbers of invasive species and pest observations recorded each year. As of July 2020, EDDMapS has over 4.9 million records. EddMaps is being used by the following states in the USET region…….


iMapInvasives is an on-line, GIS-based data management system used to assist citizen scientists and natural resource professionals working to protect our natural resources from the threat of invasive species.
The iMapInvasives Partnership facilitates the management and sharing of invasive species information, including the extent of infestations, search efforts, and treatment outcomes. 


Riparian Restoration Decision Support Tool
An innovative riparian planting and restoration decision support tool, funded by the Appalachian LCC, is now available to the conservation community of the Northeast region of the country. This user-friendly tool allows managers and decision-makers to rapidly identify and prioritize areas along the banks of rivers, streams, and lakes for restoration, making these ecosystems more resilient to disturbance and future changes in climate. It will also help the conservation community invest limited conservation dollars wisely, helping to deliver sustainable resources.



USET Climate Program Staff

Casey Thornbrugh is the Tribal Climate Science Liaison with United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) and is a citizen of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. Based at the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) at UMass-Amherst, Casey provides current climate science information to Tribal Nations in both the NE CASC and the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) regions. Casey also works with Tribal Nations to identify climate research needs and priorities and provide climate adaptation planning support.

Email: CThornbrugh@USETINC.ORG

Phone: NE CASC Office – (413) 545-2619    USET Mobile – (615) 589-1629

Tyler Everett is a Forest Adaptation Technical Assistant working for USET to provide Climate Change and Forest  Adaptation planning technical support to Tribal Nations.  Tyler is a citizen of the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and is a forester specializing in forest pests, namely the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), which is impacting Black/Brown Ash (Fraxinus nigra) on Tribal lands in northern forests.  Tyler works remotely from Maine and assists with USET Climate Change trainings, writing retreats and other climate change adaptation events. He is also in the Ph.D. program at the School of Forest Resources at the University of Maine.

Email: teverett@usetinc.org   

SC CASC and MW CASC Tribal Liaisons 

April Taylor is a Sustainability Scientist and Tribal Liaison with the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (SC CASC) and is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. April is based at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, OK and works with the goal of building research relationships with Tribal Nations in the SC CASC region.  She is actively involved with the training and development of resources for Tribal health and climate change vulnerability assessments.

Email: April.Taylor@chickasaw.net

Phone: Office – (580) 235-7430   

                                  

Sara Smith is the Midwest Tribal Resilience Liaison with the College of Menominee Nation as part of the Sustainable Development Institute.  She is a direct descendent of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin.  Sara is stationed at the US Forest Service’s Northern Forest Research Station on the University of Minnesota campus in St. Paul, Minnesota. Sara serves as a direct liaison between Tribal Nations in the Midwest and the NE CASC to identify and address research gaps in climate, natural, and cultural resources as well as improve outreach and capacity building.  Sara also coordinates meetings of the Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network (NICRN). 

Email: ssmith@menominee.edu

Phone: Office – (651) 649-5134

June 2020 Story Archive

May 2020 Story Archive

Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol II + SOCCR2

February 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

January 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

October 2019 Tribal Climate Headlines