Climate Camp

Why you should attendWhat to expectAgenda at a glance Frequently asked questions
COVID-19 Update

USET is following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Tribal, federal, and state public health guidelines and updates regarding COVID-19. The USET Tribal Climate Resilience Camp (TCRC) will adhere to all public health guidelines in planning the event and as required at the time of the event in July 2021.

Tribal Climate Resilience Camp questionnaire now available!

URGENT: The Tribal Climate Resilience Camp planning team needs your help! Please take our questionnaire to better allow us to develop the content of our camp’s curriculum. But wait—there’s more: those who submit their feedback by Tuesday, December 1 will be entered into a drawing for a lobster dinner or Maine-made memento! Act NOW! Don’t miss out!!!

Tribal Climate Resilience Camp Goal

To support teams of Tribal leaders, staff, elders, and the next generation to build resilience to climate change.

Why you should attend

  • Learn examples of Tribal climate adaptation planning
  • Identify resources from climate science centers and Tribal organizations
  • Build camaraderie with your Tribal Nation team
  • Develop climate adaptation to fit the values and priorities of your Tribal Nation/community
  • Create a strategy to engage your Tribal Nation/community in climate adaptation planning
Testimonials from the ATNI 2019 Tribal Climate Camp

What to expect

The Tribal Climate Resilience Camp will take place at the Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park in Winter Harbor, Maine. More information (amenities/resources, what to pack, etc.) will be posted soon.

Agenda at a glance

Frequently asked questions

Q: What’s the difference in camping and glamping?
A: This event is glamping. There are four walls, indoor plumbing, heat, and actual beds. Accommodations include a small kitchen and TV/cable. The latter we will be too busy to actually use! It might say “camp,” but the housing is definitely not tenting or using outhouses.

Q: Who is the ideal candidate to attend the TCRC?
A: It may not be an individual, but rather a team that makes the ideal candidate. The camp planning committee is looking for teams of three individuals from their respective Tribal Nations. Ideally the various team members would hit all three of the following descriptors:

  1. 1. Tribal environmental professional: Someone who might be spearheading the efforts in producing a climate adaptation plan, either now or in the future.
  2. Tribal leader: Could be a Council member, a community leader, or culture/traditional knowledge keeper.
  3. Next Generation Tribal Environmental Professional: Someone who has just started in natural resources and shows promise in holding a key role with the department in the future.

Q: What is a climate adaptation plan?
A: For Tribal Nations, a climate adaptation plan can come in many different forms. However, the core can be characterized as a comprehensive plan that brings together information sources (i.e., global climate models, formal vulnerability assessments, traditional ecological knowledge, etc..) and other resources to provide insight and/or generate some actions that can be taken toward adapting many different aspects of the Tribal community. These aspects include, but are not limited to, natural and cultural resources, infrastructure, businesses, housing, emergency response, and policies in order to improve their overall resiliency to the impacts of climate change.

Q: What is a vulnerability assessment?
A: A vulnerability assessment also works to synthesize and integrate information on a deeper level than a comprehensive climate adaptation plan. Information included will often be expert-derived cultural or traditional ecological knowledge, scientific knowledge, and quantitative analyses all pertaining to a particular natural/cultural resource, business, ecosystem, housing area, or emergency response protocol, and other items. This information is garnered in order to assess the degree to which that particular item or area of interest is susceptible to the impacts of climate change while also identifying what specific areas are most susceptible and/or the reasons why.

Q: Can I bring my family?
A: Considering the current situation surrounding COVID-19, it is our utmost priority to provide as safe a venue as possible and adhere to all government and Tribal regulations; meaning that it might be best to leave your family at home for this event. We will all need to be cognizant of social distancing and maintain the housing needs that meet federal and Tribal regulations. Additional people beyond our registered attendees could negatively impact these efforts.

Q: Do I need a rental car?
A: We are working on providing some shuttle services but depending on your flight and potential delays, there are a number of major rental companies at either the Bangor International Airport or Portland (Maine) International Airport. You may want a rental car for any excursions after the day’s scheduled events.

Q: Will all events and facilities be ADA accessible?
A: Yes, The Schoodic Institute facilities are ADA compliant and USET event staff will make every effort to be compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, Section 504) throughout the duration of the camp.

Q: Can I get there from here?
A: Yes! You can absolutely get to the Schoodic Institute located at Schoodic Point, Maine from anywhere. It might take a flight or two and it will involve a bit of travel but there are even options: the direct way or the more scenic way!

Direct way
Fly into Bangor International Airport (BGR). The drive from Bangor to Schoodic Institute is approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes (depending a bit on summer traffic). Take US Route 1 to Gouldsboro and turn on to Maine Route 186 at the (brown) Acadia National Park / Schoodic Section entrance sign. Follow 186 to Winter Harbor and turn left at the waterfront. Continue to the main entrance of the Schoodic Peninsula section of Acadia National Park and turn right at the sign. The park road is a six-mile, one-way loop that offers views of lobster boats, seabirds, and forest-draped islands. Keep to the right where the road splits. Schoodic Institute is located at the southernmost tip of the Peninsula. Look for entrance signs to the campus on the right before you reach Schoodic Point.

Scenic way
Fly into Portland International Airport (PWM). Please make sure you are looking at the airport for Portland Maine and not Portland Oregon. The drive from Portland to Schoodic is approximately 3.5 hours (depending on summer traffic). It can be an enjoyable and scenic trip for new visitors to Maine as this longer trip allows more time to enjoy the scenery. Take US Route 1 to Gouldsboro and turn on to Maine Route 186 at the (brown) Acadia National Park / Schoodic Section entrance sign. Follow 186 to Winter Harbor and turn left at the waterfront. Continue to the main entrance of the Schoodic Peninsula section of Acadia National Park and turn right at the sign. The park road is a six-mile, one-way loop that offers views of lobster boats, seabirds, and forest-draped islands. Keep to the right where the road splits. Schoodic Institute is located at the southernmost tip of the Peninsula. Look for entrance signs to the campus on the right before you reach Schoodic Point.